Help with Jointer Setup

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Are you using a dial indicator to align your outfeed table with the blades? If not, I highly recommend it. The TS-aligner Jr works well for this task.
--
Stoutman
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No. I've never been able to figure out how to use a dial indicator for anything. I set it up, then find I need to move it to get another "confirming" measurement so to speak. I know, I'm stupid in that respect. I did finally get the jointer working well. Just took a few minutes setting the outfeed table and blades. Cheers, cc
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James "Cubby" Culbertson wrote:

Cubby ... find a machinist who is willing to show you how. The whole thing takes just moments. The indicator is used for a single series of measurements with the understanding that you will need to do the same 3 second setup each time you start over.
I could show you how in 5 minutes and show you WAAAY mor than you will ever need to know in 30. But I doubt if I can write anything up here that will make much sense.
Understand that 1) the indicator must be firmly attached to a stable base. 2) this stable base is resting on / sliding over the reference plane (ie; on a jointer, one of the tables) 3) the surface being adjusted will end up parallel to that plane. 4) the adjustements to be made will consist of something called 'successive approximation' ... even if you make the measurements under laboratory conditions, there will always be measureable error left. If you can no longer measure the error, great. But a better test instrument could. 5) the smallest level of error you can reliably count on is 1/2 of 1 division on the dial. That is, a dial indictaor marked in .001" increments can be relied on to within .0005" +- .00025" To put this in perspective: at .003" you cannot see wich of two blocks is the larger. Below .001" it is highly unlikely that you can feel the difference between them.
All of which is to say ... don't waste time trying for more accuracy and precision than you need. If you can reliably make cuts to within 1/64" of where you intended them, you are a better man than I am and far better than many who nonetheless do outstanding work.
An indicator is an excellent way to set a blade. Mark my words. But it is not the only way to skin that particular cat.
Bill
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thanks Bill. I bought an indicator and base a while back but just haven't figured out how to take more than one measurement without having to move the thing to another location, thereby changing it's original reference. I'll learn it one of these days. Thanks for the encouragement!

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on
is
What I've found is that it is very important to ensure the total bed plane is in proper alignment. It's easy to have the infeed tilted inward toward the cutter head and the outfeed the opposite (or any of the myriad of other combinations) - such that over the total length of the two beds, there is not a parallelism. Co-planer and all those other words we like to throw around. Re-do your measurements both at the cutter head and across the total bed length.
Use your imagination and think about a piece of wood making its way through the jointer bed in all of the various misalignment configurations.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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Hiya Folks, Well I think I got it working. I adjusted the height of the outfeed table relative to the blades and was able to get it cutting without snipe and without creating that taper I was getting. Thanks much for the info. If nothing else, it was a colorful thread! What I learned: The jointer needs to be set up to within a gnat's ass in the way of tolerances. And, I need to buy a better blade. I too use the jointer to remove the blade marks. Cheers. cc
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Well, as close as possible, within wood tolerances. Though I'm still puzzled how you got the beginning of a board, as presented, narrower than the end which followed. That's characteristic of table droop, not high outfeed.
What's most interesting about this thread is the number of people who don't understand how a jointer works. Hopefully you're not one of them now, having learned that the jointer removes a measured amount of stock determined by the exposure of the knives from a board rested on the table for best average straightness. If you have parallel edges, they will remain parallel if you use your properly adjusted jointer to clip the edges. Andrew seems to have set up his own straw man, but he's right in saying that you don't _make_ stock parallel with a jointer normally. Takes scribing and working it as the big plane it is to do that.
But, if your tablesaw produces a parallel but slightly fuzzy edge because you've gone too long between sharpenings, or you're feeding too fast and it vibrates, or you tuck it a bit into the side as you transition to the push-stick, &cetera ... you can clean it up with a quick pass on the jointer prior to gluing. Some of us are so lazy in the other areas we allow for one pass in our original rip. Or three, with lower grade lumber where we might release tension and get a bow in the resulting piece. Thing is to be smart enough to sight it and repair it at the jointer. Betting ripping misfeeds and less-than-great lumber are the reasons for people's stance against jointers. Had they sighted after the rip, they might have other opinions.
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"George" wrote in message

don't
You seem to have some misconceptions about its use/misuse yourself:

Unfortunately, that is very often not true, as these threads clearly point out.
The edges, or faces, of dimensioned stock are usually "parallel", but rarely perfectly flat. Despite well set up machines and practiced technique, run that stock over a jointer and the edges/faces are guaranteed to be no longer "parallel".
Again, a jointers intended use is not for "dimensioning" stock, but for preparing it to be dimensioned.
Use it any other way and the unwary should be prepared to be surprised with stock that is tapered to some extent.
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I see you *finally* understand the reason for using a jointer on S4S lumber.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

But, apparently, not the obvious, which is that a parallel edge produced by ripping against a _jointer-straightened_ edge, not the straw man, will remain parallel if a measured amount is removed along one edge by the jointer.
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"George" wrote in message

by
LOL! Quite different from your earlier, blanket statement, but close enough for some purposes ... just like the results often obtained from using a jointer for other than it's primary purpose.
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That is true and place your self in the group that has not been properly trained by a qualified instructor if you still believe that a taper will not result.
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I can think of two possibilities:
1) the board is bowed (not straight, end-to-end), and he's holding the board with the ends up and the middle down (as opposed to ends down and middle up), and he's starting the cutting with pressure on the front of the board, so the front edge is cut in the first pass. The tail of the board is then well above the knifes when it gets there, on the first pass. Subsequent passes keep cutting at the front, and eventually cut at the back as the surface flattens, but the end result is a flat face with a thin edge at the front (cut on every pass) and a thick one at the back (only cut on last pass). Put pressure on the back first, and the opposite occurs. You need to start with pressure in the middle, not the ends - or even better, turn the board over so it sits on the two ends and they get knocked off together. This is "technique". The less flat the board, the more important that the technique be good.
2) something is a bit loose in the jointer tables. With no pressure on them, everything seems to line up just fine - it is "properly set up". As soon as pressure is placed on the infeed or outfeed table, however, it droops. Thus, the droop or misalignment is there when cutting, but not apparent when measured during setup.
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