Help with directions on making a Copy Stand. (Deciphering is more like it)

Hi-
I found directions on how to make a Photo "Copy Stand" and went out and bought the materials and started building it....I am unsure whether or not I just have no idea what I am doing or the instructions are poor and in some cases just incorrect...
The url of these directions are:
http://www.frontiernet.net/~rjacob/copystnd.htm
Primarily my questions have to do with the sizes of the pine. Some of the instructions seem to be implied which doesn't help me any as I am *NOT* good with woodworking (or any building for that matter)...However, I am good at following good directions :)
If anyone could assist deciphering I'd appreciate it.
I'm up to #4
Thanks! -sd
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It looks pretty straight forward to me but I obviously didn't try to build it. What about the pine 7 instructions are confusing?
Bob McBreen - Yarrow Point Washington
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The plans call for the following:
2 pieces 3/4" thick plywood 16" wide by 24" long (for base) 2 pieces 1/4" thick hardboard (tempered board) 11" long by 4" wide (for sides of sliding arm) 1 piece 3/4" thick pine 2" wide by 6-1/2" long (front of sliding arm) 2 pieces 3/4" thick pine 2" wide by 8-1/4" long (top & bottom filler blocks of sliding arm) 2 pieces 3/4" thick pine 1-3/4" wide by 4" long (for back of sliding arm)
When you purchase lumber at one of the borg's (Home Depot, Lowes, etc.) it is "nominal" in size. For instance a 2"x4" (2 by 4) is really 1-1/2" thick by 3-1/2" wide and a 1"x3" board is really 3/4" thick by 2-1/2" wide. So if you were to purchase one board such as an 8 foot long 1 by 4 you would get a board that is 8 foot long, 3/4" thick by 3-1/2" wide.
The reduction in sizes is from milling the boards.
Hope the above helps.
Bob S.

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Thanks alot!
ALso- What is MILLING? and also what exactly is BEVELING in woodworking? Do I need a special tool for this? The plans indicate the need to bevel two pieces of wood. I know beveling in the sense of what it *is*, but not sure how that translates to woodworking.
Thanks! -sd

Cheers, -sd http://www.zoom.sh
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Milling is a sort of generic term meaning you take a machine (the mill) and grind, plane, or otherwise change the shape or dimensions. In this case, milling would putting the wood through a planer to reduce the thickness.
Beveling can be done many ways. You can use a hand plane, a router, or set the blade on the table saw at an angle. Ed
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Some Dude wrote:

To bad you didn't ask questions before you started. First, you could probably buy an old or trashed enlarger for much cheaper than making this copy setup and it would work better. Second, you certainly didn't need two pieces of 3/4" plywood for the base. Most enlargers are much heavier and use only a 3/4" thick base, including my Beseler C23.
To answer your question. The pieces in the drawing and dimension given for the wood are the exact dimensions. The sliding piece is essentially a hollow box. The top and bottom are identical, 2" wide and 8-1/4" long with a V cut at the back end. To cut this V, measure 1" from the back and make a line, measure 1 inch over on this line (center of board width) and connect each corner to this point. That is the line you cut on. The front piece (where you attach the camera) is 2" x 6". The rear consists of two 4" long 3/4" thick and 1-1/2" wide. However these two pieces have a 45 degree cut. So the final dimension is 1-1/2 wide on one side and 3/4" wide on the other side. Don't know how you are doing this but the easiest way is to clamp so that the long dimension is vertical. On the end, measure 3/4 inch toward the center from one corner and connect this point to the other closest corner and saw vertically. (you may want to make a mark all the way along the board for you saw to follow) In other words, you will cut off a triangle that is 3/4" on two sides and 4 " long. Because they are only 3/4 thick that leave a space of 1/2 between them when you attach them to the hardboard and that allows the clamp bolts to pull them together. However they don't need to move together much because the outside diameter of your 1-1/4" pipe will nearly fill the square hole.
Hope this helps.
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Yeah I know about the enlarger thing. But I wanted to challenge myself as I am seriously challenged with building things and need to improve that. (Designing, however, if my job) :)
Thanks alot for the clarification of the instructions!!!
Cheers! -sd
Cheers, -sd http://www.zoom.sh
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