Help with Converting 4inch DC piping to smaller sizes

I have a need to convert a 4 inch dust collection system to a smaller 1 1/2 inch connector on a belt & disk sanding station. Is the standard size for 2 1/2 pipe, a inside or outside diameter? If it usually a outside diameter, what is the usual inside measurements? If I purchase 2 1/2 inch flexible pipe where can I find the correct fittings to mate the 2 1/2 inch pipe to the 1 1/2 in connector on the sander?
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JT wrote:

You will most likely have to reduce the 4" in two stages. First a 4" to 2.5" O.D. reducer and then use a "Universal Tool Adapter" which has a "stepped design contains a 1", 1-1/4", 1-1/2" and 2" external diameter and a 1-1/4", 1-1/2" and 2-1/2" internal diameter connection. It also has a square flange with mounting holes that can be used with a collection box." See WoodCraft Product Number 142173: http://shop.woodcraft.com/Woodcraft/product_family.asp?family%5Fid 9&giftlse&0pt%2Easp%2Cdept%5Fid%3D10000%26Tree%3D%2CDepartments&1pt%2Easp%2Cdept%5Fid%3D2170%26menu%5Fid%3D%26Tree%3D0%2CDust%20Collection&2pt%2Easp%2Cdept%5Fid%3D1199%26menu%5Fid%3D%26Tree%3D1%2CHose%20%26%20Fittings&Giftlse&mscssid1F30E1AD8154B66A5983EBB27B7330
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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I wanted to hook my table saw up to a shop vac (no, it doesn't do a perfect job, but gets 75%; and I have neither room nor budget for a dust collector) but couldn't find an adaptor. So I made one out a PVC pipe fitting from the plumbing department. Works great and only cost a dollar or so. It didn't fit perfectly, but a wrap of duct tape took care of that. Worth a try.
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Another way is to bore a hole in a piece of 3/4" ply to fit the small pipe and then cut out a disk with the hole in the center to fit inside the larger one. Clear? Hummmmm...well you are really making a bushing right? Cheap, easy and you don't have to make another trip to the hardware store. DD PS A bit of duct tape is also needed...
"It's easy when you know how..." Johnny Shines
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Maybe yes, maybe no. They have stepped cone type adapters at most places, but nothing seems standard in the world of connections. Duct tape on the JET sander to use the same 2 1/2 setup that quickly and easily seals on the Delta bandsaw. Description of the connections are the same in the respective manuals.
That said, going down from 4" to a 1 1/2 isn't as good as just slapping my old noisy wet/dry, with its high vacuum on my Bosch sanders. I'm sure the fluid dynamics folks can tell you why.

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I've noticed the same thing. I've got a BT-3000 saw, which comes with a blade shroud leading to a 2-1/2" port on the back. My 600 CFM dust collector's 4" ductwork reduced down to 2-1/2" is almost useless connected to it. My shop vac does a much better job. I now use the DC mostly on my 12" planer with a 4" hose. The planer produces vastly more debris than the table saw, yet the DC gets every drop.
Interestingly enough, I get much better dust collection with the regular throat plate than I do with a zero-clearance insert. I suspect it had to do with the wider slot in the regular plate allowing greater airflow.
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No mystery. Turbulence around the "zero" clearance keeps a lot up top. It even works that way on bandsaws, as I discovered when I put on one of those UHMW plates.

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So, it would probably be better to build a large shroud around the sander, much like you would around a miter saw, right? On Mon, 27 Oct 2003 07:52:07 -0500, "George"

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Would be my choice, but point source better than large. There's a wealth of fittings out there in plastic, or in metal at your heating store. I use metal modified to fit my ancient planer, suppose you could make use of a plenum connector (square) and some magnets or other fixed support if your sander is on a dedicated table. I use one when sanding on the lathe, and sticking it to the bed in the right position keeps the Kleenex clean even if I forget the mask.

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By point source, I suppose you mean a shroud that is directed more at the source of the dust rather than just large open cavity?
On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 07:21:53 -0500, "George"

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Ayup.
Pretty easy to enlist rotation and gravity as allies. Remember the inverse square rule, and keep it close.
wrote:

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Before I leave this subject of Dust Collection, I need another best suggestion. What is the best way to connect standard 4 inch flex hose to PVC piped DC system? Currently I am planning to use blast gates but was wondering if there may be something better. I have seen where a lot of folks on here use PVC piped systems but since the sizes are so different I have often wondered what methods were used to connect everything up. On Wed, 29 Oct 2003 07:53:14 -0500, "George"

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I use aluminum blast gates, which are slightly smaller than the 4" PVC Pipe, I glue the blast gate into the pipe with silicone sealant. On the flex hose size I use a pipe clamp.
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