Help with 60's-70's Craftsman Table Saw ID and parts, please.

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I am looking for some help for the Craftsman 10" Table Saw that I inherited from my Dad. I remember him buying it used in the early 70's, so my guess is that it is a late 60's early 70's model. I have looked all over it in search of a part number in hopes of fixing it up a little but the only thing that I can find is the word "Emerson" and a part number that no one recognizes on the bottom of the insert. The insert has a little lever that you lift to install and remove the insert. The Saw is belt driven, with the motor hanging out back of the saw, and a V-belt running to a pulley driving the blade. The Tilt adjust is on the left, the height adjust in on the front, and the adjustments are made with 4" or so plastic knobs with plastic handles. There is a angle scale on the front with a metal indicator. The Top is cast iron and it has one open grid cast iron wing. The fence is a "T" type with a lever that you push down to lock it in place, the fence also has a knob for "fine adjustments" that is spring loaded and engages a track under the metal rail that is attached to the front of the saw and the wing. There is a nice big "Craftsman" logo on the front. There are no markings on the motor, but it is wired for 110V. The on/off switch is mounted under the table just to the right of the blade on the front of the saw. It is a grey rocker switch with no "safety key". The saw body looks like bent sheet metal and is painted black. It has a leg set attached that is made similar to the body of the saw.
With that said, There are several things that I would like to fix on the saw if I could. The angle and elevation controls have about a 1-2 turn "slop" in them before they engage to move the blade, and the "lock down" bolt that is on the front seems to have no effect. What is needed to fix these? It also sounds like some bearings may be going, is there a good place to get information on how to replace those?
Thanks.
Mike
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The saw was manufactured by Emerson Electric. The motor might be a 1 hp unit. Motors have gotten more powerful over the years. Your saw sounds a lot like mine, but mine is much older as it has a repulsion-induction motor (Emerson discontinued this type of motor in 1953). Your motor may be capacitor start induction run.
As far as I know, parts for the angle and elevation controls are no longer available, and they haven't been for quite some time.
Replacing the bearings is rather easy. You need to remove the arbor, and then remove the bearings. Then you go to an electric repair shop or an automotive parts store for replacement. After putting grease on the bearings, you insert them back in the housing, insert the arbor, and tighten the nuts which hold everything together.
Jim
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Goose wrote:

I also inherited my my father-in-law's Sears table saw. He bought the saw in about 1969. From the description it sounds the same as mine.
I have always assumed that the adjustment wheels were made from aluminum not plastic. As for the gages on the saw, I never use them. To square the blade I use a solid square triangle or a protractor if other angles are required.
With the design of the saw I have to periodically take a wire brush to the adjustment screws and the locking bolt to get the sawdust and grim from the threads. It sounds like the set screw in the adjustment wheels are loose or the shafts badly scored from being loose. If so this should be an easy fix.
Fortunately my father was a saver, so I have the original paperwork from the saw. It has all of the part numbers, etc. I can make a copy, (which I should have done years ago as the paper is wearing out) and send you a copy of you would like. It will be a big file. Once copied the file would be at least 2 to 3 mb and will be in the PDF format.
As for Sears having the parts, you may be surprised.
Additionally you may wish to check the following site.
http://www.owwm.com /
If you would like the file please use email not the newsgroup.
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Dang,
I've got one of those, or its cousin.
Dad gave it to me when I bought my first house, a fixer upper.
It still works great, has the slop you mentioned, and cuts wood real good.
I replaced the fence with a t-square type fence because it would always move when I locked it.
Also replaced the belt with a link type belt, with a great improvement in vibration.
Enjoy.
Old guy.

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Old Guy?
Wow, that's what my kids call me, at least my grandkid is too young to know better.
Fortunately the fence seems to hold well, the miter seems pretty true, I just need to adjust the blade so that it is parallel to the miter slot, the back of the blade is farther from the fence than the front.
Well, in the continuing saga the power switch died. would anyone have a newer style pull-on-push-off that they would sell? I missed a couple on epay.
Thanks for the help, y'all
Mike

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On Mon, 22 Sep 2008 19:48:00 -0700, Goose wrote:

If it's set up like other contractor saws, take a look at the PALS system:
http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid 591
I put one on my saw and it sure made aligning it a lot easier.
Don't forget to check it with the blade at both 90 and 45 degrees. If it's on for one and off for the other, the rods connecting the two trunnions are not in the same plane - a real pain to fix as shims seem to be the only way.
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Harbor Freight has generic motor switch. You can also go the starter and push button route. Takes some time but well worth it.
Bob AZ
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Bob, Thanks for the tip,that gives me a couple more ideas to look into.
While I am asking questions, where could I find a replacement insert for this saw?
Mike

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"Goose" wrote:

for this saw?
Why not make some?
That way, you can have a collection of zero clearance inserts.
Lew
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For those of you reading this thread, I have a question in regard to zero clearance inserts. The table saw I have is a 35 year old Rockwell Beaver 34050. Cutting the outline of an insert is no problem, but I'm a little stumped on a workable method to properly raise the insert flush with table saw top. The metal insert I have has adjustable Allen screws which don't seem all that workable in a home made wooden zero clearance insert.
How do you raise your insert?
Thanks.
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Upscale wrote:

[1] Drill holes for adjusters with a #7 drill bit. [2] Tap 1/4-20 [3] Use a toothpick to smear a /tiny/ bit of silicone caulk on threads [4] Insert Allen screw and adjust flush [5] Allow time for caulk to set
:-)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Thanks, good method. All thing being equal, I'm betting something similar would work with 1/4 dowel.
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Upscale wrote:

Probably - but might be a bit more difficult to adjust with dowels. I kinda like the "all-wood" aspect, tho.
A maple insert with dark walnut or cherry dowels might be pretty. :-)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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similar
I wondered about the use of the Allen screws in that regard. With the caulk set, are they fixed in position or thread height adjustable? I was thinking that using dowel in their stead, I could make them over-long and file them off as needed to optimum length.
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Upscale wrote:

I've only done this one time, and the insert got lost in a long-past move. Once I had it the way I wanted it I never tried to re-adjust. I'd guess that I could've used Allen screws without the caulk.
Try your idea. It sounds workable, and if it doesn't pan out there's always the Allen screw option. I haven't tapped wood very often, but doing so hasn't produced problems for me.
Another option is to glue in a threaded brass insert or a Propel nut (kinda like a T-nut without teeth), which would provide metal threads for the Allen screws - but that'd be more expensive and take more screwing [sorry] around.
I'm sure you've seen the brass inserts, and LV carries Propel nuts (I used 'em for the Allen screws that level the table on my RAS - there's a peek-a-boo photo at the link below)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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"Upscale" wrote:

Trap it with the fence so blade is at least 1/2" away from fence.
Use 1/4-20 socket head set screws for adjustment.
I make mine from 3 pieces of 1/4 hardboard held together with double back tape, then sanded flush. No screws req'd.
YMMV
Lew
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wrote:

Made mine from 1/2" UHMW PE with a dovetailed recess for 1/4" replaceable inserts. Drilled and tapped holes for #6 setscrews in the appropriate locations. Would work just as well with a hardwood body. I frequently drill and tap UNC threads in hardwood and BB plywood.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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On Tue, 23 Sep 2008 01:36:37 -0500, Upscale wrote:

I took 9/16" cedar (fence pickets) and planed/sanded it to the thickness I needed (about 1/2"). No raising needed.
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wrote in message

I cut the insert (MDF) very close to the desired depth and then used tape layers for a flush fit.....works fine but for my next go around I think I'll try hot melt glue (should be less fiddle till its just right time), probably wax or oil the saw side (no stick). A press fit before the glue hardens should make a easy exact flush edge. Rod
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Mike
I would go online and find the handbook or manual at the Sears site and try to order the insert there. If no luck I would make one or try another brand. My sister does woodwork and has made a few of them from among other materials such as plastic, masonite and aluminum. irst make a nice pattern from cardboard or the like. And save the pattern for next time.
Bob AZ
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