Help! - Newbie in way over his head

Page 2 of 2  

On Tue, 14 Jun 2005 19:00:37 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

That's about what I'm going to end up paying after i consider all the cans of Rusto (5 lacquer and 2 primer) and filler I bought!
But - on the bright side - at least I didn't have to spring for a $20 brush to tip it with!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
4ax.com:
...

Like DadiOH said ... I bet you're getting dry spray where the paint is partially drying before it sticks. It might be that short 6" stroke thing you mentioned.
The idea with the spray can is to hold it about somewhere around a foot away from the surface to be sprayed (or whatever your can says), and keeping the can perpindicular to the surface, go in a long even stroke across the length. Too fast and it won't wet to cover and flow, and too slow and it will run. Then on the next stroke you'll want to overlap it slightly with the previous one so that the coverage is even and the blend line stays more or less wet.
Anyway, like the other posters said ... to fix it you can sand the surface smooth with a fine grit sandpaper (I'd guess at least 220 grit), and then spray another coat using the instructions above.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thank you all so much for your responses, especially DadiOh! The project is now fully sprayed and looks fairly good from about 3ft away. The overspray was alleviated to a large extent by my technique and the finish looks fairly even and quite glossy.
Except (there's always an exception, isn't there?) there are a few sags. I tried to sand them clean in between coats (used my fingers to test smoothness) but I must have not sanded quite enough. I really don't want to lay down another finish coat of lacquer over this. I was wondering if it would be possible to somehow sand these imperfections flat locally and then buff the entire surface out. I am shooting for just a nice sheen, perhaps warmish glow, not a mirror surface.
I tried the #0000 steel wool and it takes all the shine out. Does provide for a very even surface, color-wise though. Perhaps it is possible to further buff the surface to achieve more shine? To do that, what grades of sandpaper should I be looking at? Cutting compound perhaps?? Also, how long should I wait to start this process? Thanks again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
4ax.com:

You might want to try a product called Meguiar's Scratch-X, available at automotive stores. It's a pretty aggressive abrasive and is a fairly fast way to get the first shine.
Of course you'll want to test it on a scrap first. I've not used it on black spray lacquer before, so I'm not sure it's compatible.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ensure the lacquer is fully cured prior to rubbing out. If the Meguiar's product doesn't take it far enough toward gloss Jeff carries Menzerna polishing stuff that work quite well. www.homesteadfinishing.com also has a few forums for broadening your education.
On Fri, 17 Jun 2005 05:17:21 GMT, Nate Perkins

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

fast
Another option's to make a paste of talcum and water. It's not as aggressive and takes a lot of elbow grease but it certainly brings up a lovely shine. I believe that Rolls Royce used to use it many years ago for their finishes...
Another case of both ensuring the lacquer is fully cured first and doing a test sample, but they apply no matter what method is tried!
- Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.