Help needed staining red oak


I have to make a panel to finish a new wall oven cutout and after some fiddling at a local paint store have found that yellow over red oak is a very good match. The person at the store didn't have any stain that would work but used regular yellow paint to see how it looked. She didn't know the specifics of how to make a yellow stain from paint but said that it could be done. So what I'd like to try is to make a yellow stain by thinning yellow paint, but I'm not sure what the proper mixture would be, or whether to use latex or oil-based paint. The cabinets I'm matching are straw colored with gray and pink/red graining accentuated. Any suggestions would be appreciated!
Stacy
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In my humble opinion, I would not even try to match what you have. The task you have is one of the most difficult; evened people with decades of staining experience often fumble at matching an existing finish. How about accenting the area with a complimentary color? A botched match job tends to make one think ---nice try--- whereas an accent panel can be at least interesting. Just my thoughts. Dave

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I was starting to agree with that except the match from the sample from the store is so close that I've changed my mind. Anyway, the "panels" on my refrigerator and dishwasher aren't an exact match (light oak standard panels) so its a bit eclectic to begin with. As long as I can match the grain I think it will look fine.
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Stacy wrote:

Rather than paint as the base, I'd buy artists' oil colors and use it in mineral spirits to make the stain...how large a piece do you have to deal with to get an idea on volumes required?
If you were to start w/ a paint, I'd use an oil base and see if they have a transparent stain rather than a paint base to start from...then thin from there.
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Actually there is a panel and a drawer I'm going to make bigger. its 34" x 27" total.
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Stacy wrote:

OK, just small amount...hope you have a sizable amount of scrap material to test on that is large enough to tell what the piece will actually look like...
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

I don't have anything yet. I have to get the wood, but red oak is expensive.
What mixture do I need to use?
Stacy
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Stacy wrote:

It'll be a trial and error effort...for such a small spot if you found a color that seemed reasonable in a mixed oil base paint, that would be one possible way to start...thin it to a wash and try it--you can always add more color, you can't take it off. The hard part will be getting a tint that actually works on the wood you have to work with--nothing but trying with the material you're going to use will solve that problem. "Red oak" can run the gamut from a very bright almost pink to cream to nearly white...so depending on the effect you want, it's going to pretty much depend on what you start with.
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Stacy said:

It's a tough job. There are alcohol and water based stains available that I would personally consider before using paint. A tremendous amount of effort can go into matching this, and time will still alter it's appearance. You might consider a contrasting trim instead.
Look here for a selection of stains: http://www.tools-for-woodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWCATS&Category (0 (Highland Hardware)
There is a downloadable color chart available, but <insert lengthy laundry list of reasons why this doesn't help much>.
Good Luck,
Greg G.
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Take a look at the General Finishes site
http://www.generalfinishes.com /
They have some yellow stains here. Scroll to the bottom of the page for the yellow.
http://www.generalfinishes.com/finishes/water-base-finishes/waterbase_finishes.htm#EFCountryColors
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Stacey Use minwax "Natural" which is nothing more than the vehicle of all minwax stains use UTC's to acheive the desired color, it will take some trial and error but an exact match is aceivable. when trying out your samples the end color will be as when you first stain it .As the stain dry's the color wanders but come back when topcoated when you think you are close to where you want to be then apply a topcoat of your desire to see what the end product will actually be. from there you may have more color to add to get it perfect. It does take a knack and a lot of experience to do this, just about any color on any wood is achievable.
Good Luck, George

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On Sun, 13 Nov 2005 22:23:03 -0700, "George M. Kazaka"

That's what I was thinking. My whole house is red oak stuff and I have played with a lot of stain. Go to the Home store and look at the samples of red oak and the various stains. Then buy a few small cans of colors that look close. Then it is just mixing up what you think is right, trying it and seeing what you got. Be sure to put the top coat on (poly or whatever) since that shades the stain too. Usually there is enough variation in natural woods that you can get away with a less than perfect match.
I like cherry over red oak but that may be too red for what you are doing. It is a good match for the Kemper cabinet "red oak" we had to match in the kitchen..
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