Help: Need advice for a friend hopefully someone with experience using a dremel can answer this

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SawDust wrote:

router. Basically think of it as cutting a 3" wide, 3" deep slot with your 1.5hp and a 3/4" bit, you will need to make about 100 passes per slot :). Since dremel's don't have much power and the bits are small and don't have a lot of mass they don't hit very hard when they do break so long as she is wearing safety glasses and not a low cut shirt like the girl carpenters she's seen on tv ;) Why not give her a handful of biscuits and let her cut biscuit slots with the dremel? At least have her try on a scrap piece so she can realize that it will take two hours of cutting or a dozen broken bits per slot.
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You've answered your own question.
/religion and/or philosophy on
That little voice in your head was put there for a reason. Listen to it.
/religion and/or philosophy off
Patriarch
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So take up inlay work. With a base to turn it into a mini-router, it's quite a useful tool for small jobs like this.
Personally I'd much rather have a hanging motor and flexi shaft, like a Foredom, rather than a hand-held motor like a Dremel.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Well, this should be safe enough if she uses a 3/4 bit; the dremel will immediately stall and not move. The low torque on the dremel's the issue. Just like any router, safety relates to the bit size and how deep a cut. I've never tried this with mine, but imagine that if you go slowly enough, it will eventually work. Many people do use the dremel router on wood, mostly for very shallow cuts following a pattern, for putting a design on the surface.
Regarding hot/snap, if she tried a 1/8 bit and pushed it a little too hard, it could very easily fly off.
GerryG

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What she's trying to do isn't inherently unsafe. I doubt you'll be able to find a bit for it anywhere near 3/4". I think 1/4" is the largest you can get. The dremel doesn't have a whole lot of torque and with a 3/4" bit it would bog down .3 seconds into the cut. She'll probably end up making a dozen or so shallow passes with a 1/4" bit in order to get the required width and depth, and if she has a steady hand it won't look that bad.
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She's trying to move a pile of sand with a pair of tweezers...
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Sorry, I didn't answer that question.
Yes it will be safe to do if she moves the tool slowly and takes cuts no deeper than 1/8 inch. 1/16 inch would be safer. Slower is better.
Going past safe to is it sane...
Calculate the number of cuts it will take.
1/8 inch bit cutting at 1/16 deep. 10 passes for width, six passes for depth (probably 80, to do propoer cleanup at the bottom if doesn't have a chisel...). 60-80 passes PER dado or groove.
Figure a Dremel bit MIGHT last 30-50 passes before it's too dull to be useful. So 2-4 bits per dado or groove.
Value of her time + cost of bits = cheap router and 3/8 bit, IMO
djb
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Thank You David... Kudos for both responses.
Pat
On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 18:32:16 -0600, Dave Balderstone

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'cept for the obvious typos, which are, well... obvious.
And it's Dave, not David... Start calling me David and Keeter might get confused as to which Canuck he's poking fun at.
;-)
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I've done a little cutting with a Dremel. Limited usefulllness, but handy for the "right" job.
Remember growing up and your mother told you not to touch the electric fence or your father told you not to hold the spark plug wire as you pulled the cord, or a couple of dozen other things you just had to experience? Same deal here.
Safety is not an issue if done properly Wear safety glasses, slow feed rate, etc.
The problem is not the tool but your friend. My guess is that she has the tool and is determined to get the job done. Nothing you do or say is going to dissuade her. However, you can be confident that she will soon learn her lesson. You can suggest she try her technique on a scrap of wood first. Three hours later, when she is on pass number 63, she may finally concede the Dremel is just not the right tool. Ed
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