Help me understand this jig

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As you all know I am an extreme newbie with acess to some small free boards. I saw this jig for jointing on a tabel saw. Can someone explain to me how it works and how to build it. I am having trouble understanding it.
Would it be good for squaring up uneven or crooked cuts?
Can I use a 1 x 4 board which I have instead of the mdf?
http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/2005/01/28/wb /
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Just found another one. I understand this one better. WOuld it be as good?
http://www.glen-l.com/wood-plywood/plate10h.html stryped wrote:

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x-no-archive: no How about this one? Tom http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?&offerings_idd15&SearchHandle DBDADFDADADDDGDDGDDBDJGGGDDBDJCNGEGCDADBCNDEDJDJDBCNDJGGDJDECNDGDFDHDADHDCDIGCGGDEDAGEDADADADBDADADADADIGKGPGJGOHEGJGOGHDADADADEDADADADADADADADBDFDADADADBDADADADADADADADADADADADADBDADADADADIGKGPGJGOHEGJGOGHDADADADBDB&filter=jointing
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Very gimmicky. The clamps are under the wood, so it can't possibly be level [unless the saw is bevelled to make the 90 deg cut ...very dicey to adjust, depending on the width of the wood.
Also, two finger-tight little clamps cutting through hardwood? I don't think so. Not for me, at least.
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http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?&offerings_idd15&S ...
Guess who wrote:

I suppose I'd have to see the contraption in person, myself. Just seemed a little less difficult to set up than what the OP was looking at. Tom
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Both jigs are way over thought and complicated.
I built one that is quite simple. It uses a piece of 3/4" thick plywood about 5" wider than the stock that you will ever want to straighten and I use the full 8" length. Lay the piece of wood to be straightened on top of that plywood and clamp it down with those toggle type clamps that are attached by screws, to the plywood. The wood to be straightened should over hang the edge of the plywood where it needs to be trimmed. Set your rip fence and run the plywood along the fence only cutting the stock that needs to be straightened.

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Either jig will work equally well. I wouldn't spend a lot of time looking for different jigs, they're all going to be built around the same principle.
Yes - you can use 1X4, or any other stock instead of MDF.
These jigs will give you a straight edge from which to work. If that's what you mean by squaring up uneven or crooked cuts, then the answer is yes.
Don't take offense at this suggestion, but based on your description of your abilities, and the nature of the questions you are asking here, I would suggest a basic course in woodworking and power tools at your local community college. This group is a great place to get a lot of really good advice, ideas and coaching, but it is not a good place to come to develop basic skills. While you can certainly get all of the basic information you'd ever need here (and then some...), you'll never get past all of the questions that come with each answer. There's just no substitute for a teacher for the fundamentals. At this point, you wouldn't even know how to sort out the good ideas from the bad, recognize techniques that are within your capability, or deal with the dizzying array of tool options for any one given project issue.
There's a lot to be respected in the woodshop and a solid foundation of knowledge with respect to the capabilities, the proper usage, the dangers, and the care and maintenance is a must. I would suggest that absent that, giving an inexperienced, unguided and unknowledgeable individual too much free advice in a usenet newsgroup would border on reckless.
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Mike, while your points are all valid, and your suggestion is a good one, I hope the OP will not be discouraged by them. Many of us here are hobbyists who learned (and are continuing to learn) with no training, but by sucking in all the knowledge we can get from books, magazines, internet, etc. This results often in delayed learning (the "Gee, why didn't I think of that 15 years ago?" experience I have had too often). That experience could have been avoided with a course, but we have still learned a lot and had fun with the hobby.
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On Thu, 19 Jan 2006 10:03:07 -0500, alexy wrote:

I'm definitely in this camp. I hated woodworking at school, barely turned up and ditched the class as soon as possible. Now, 20 years later I love it!
Watching Norm (as much as people seem to dislike his style) and other programs here in the UK (Boyz in the Wood seem like such hackers compared to Norm), reading books, subscribing to ShopNotes and this here group help a lot.
The number one thing I've learnt is that I'm quite a sensible guy in general. So, if something gives me an uneasy feeling then the liklihood is that I'm doing something dangerous/stupid - put it down, have a walk around and a think about another way of doing. Learning to listen to my built in safety instincts has saved me from any accidents so far (touch nearest bit of 2x4!).
You can do it safely at home without training, as long as you're willing to read/watch a lot of stuff and are good at absorbing information.
Cheers,
Andy
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But you had a shop class in school. It gave you some fundamentals. That's all I'm talking about in my comments. From there, you were able to move ahead when you wanted to with some self paced learning. That's a lot different than not having any background at all.
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On Thu, 19 Jan 2006 18:14:13 -0500, Mike Marlow wrote:

Seriously, I wouldn't consider anything I did at school woodworking. I barely used a saw and a chisel. I made one thing out of wood and it was awful (a paper holder: marbel in a sloped slot with a piece of perspex screwed to the front).
I really do consider myself a "self-taught" woodworker and give absolutely 0 credit to my school. That's not me being greedy, but it does reflect that I literally hacked with a chisel and cut a bit of wood roughly square.
Cheers,
Andy
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to
lot
square.
I might have to cry "uncle" at this point, because as I was thinking about it I realized that besides shop class (which I don't recall being much more informative or beneficial than you describe - though I'm sure it *had* to have been...), way back in high school, I never really had any instruction either. I picked up most of what I "know" by practical experience and by hanging out where woodworking was happening. That includes places like newsgroups, wood shops, with friends who cut things up, etc. I learned about kickback without the benefit of high speed cameras.
At the same time, I grew up in an era when this kind of thing was a more common find in almost every household to some degree, or certainly in every neighborhood. Knowing how to use power tools was common knowledge and you sort of absorbed knowledge by osmosis. You ended up with some pretty kludgey practices and some half baked "knowledge", but you did grow up with a certain familiarity with these things. You learned some basic safety practices that everyone with a table saw adhered to, no matter how well schooled they were. No one really worried about rust on their saw top, but every boy that had ever stepped within 10 feet of a table saw knew the cardinal rule of safety - don't put your beer down on the saw top... it'll get sawdust in it.
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On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 08:03:32 -0500, Mike Marlow wrote:

Sounds very familiar (thinking back I'm sure I had to have done more than that in a year's class, but maybe not, maybe I just dossed around because I didn't care - I did that in classes that didn't interest me).

Fortunately I'm careful because I take peoples word for it, I've never witnessed kickback and hope to never see it by taking precautions those who have advised...

It'd be nice to grow up in that sort of era/neighbourhood. I had one friend who was in to woodworking (back before I was), he died about 3 years ago and I started picking it up about a year after that so I never got to understand his advice (except for making a jig to make some large finger joints).

I'm actually getting used to the taste of wood in drinks - I never remember to cover my cup and always end up chewing on something when I take a mouthful without looking.
Cheers,
Andy
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No contest Alex, but most of us in that category had some sort of starting point, beit having worked with our father a bit as kids, or a good shop class in school, or some other hands on mentored envrionment. I'm not suggesting a class room career for a person just getting into this stuff, but I do think there are some basics that just can't be picked up from a newsgroup.
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The principle is the same as jointer, only in this case, the "jointer bed" would be the wooden piece, enclosing the saw blade.
From my experience....
There is no "adjustment" possible. The amount of wood removed in each pass is dictated by by the difference between the input side and the output side.* (I suppose it's possible to design in some adjustability, BUT that would be limited by the thickness of the saw blade.) The result is usually a jig that removes the smallest possible amount of wood on every pass, (1/32" ?????) so boards require a great many, multiple passes.
AND The length of the backer board in the jig (that acts like the jointer bed) is really very short in comparison to most jointers. (In other words, "jointing" a two or three foot board, is entirely possible. But the effectiveness drops in direct relation to length of the board. Trying this on a six or eight foot stick, is probably a waste of time.)
AND, the average 10" saw blade can't handle anywhere near the board thickness that the average 4" jointer could handle ... Two inches is about the upper limit. (Except that most 4" jointers are woefully underpowered)
*AND, jig set up must be meticulously done, each and every time. The outfeed side MUST be perfectly flush with the sawblade. Otherwise. weird shapes emerge.
AND you'd better use the best saw blade with the most teeth that you have. (Mount your best blade in the table saw. Now, do a short rip down the length of hardwood. Examine the cut, closely. Is it acceptably smooth? Because, that's as smooth as it's going to get with the jig.)
HINT: You have to raise the blade to cut out opening. Do this twice, but the second time, move the fence just a bit closer. You really, really, really need to create some clearance between the back of the saw blade and the backer board. otherwise, you will end up with some really pretty charcoal.
That said, providing you build the jig with a good deal of precision, IT will work well, given the limitations mentioned above. In my experience, such an arrangement will equal the product of my 40 year old Craftsman 4" jointer. (But that jointer is little more than a toy, albeit that it does have a very small "footprint").
I have a larger woodworking are now, and I will be replacing my "toy" jointer for a "real" one. When I do get another jointer, both the craftsman jointer and jig will be history.
James...
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Sure.... any of these jigs will give you a STRAIGHT edge but it won't be a JOINTED edge. Any wobble or irregularity in your blade or in your skill at moving the material through the blade will result in saw marks left on the edge. I am assuming that you want to make edges that can be glued together without a visible glue line. If you want to make straigt edges then these jigs are OK.

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And because a jointer is only primarily intended to straighten 1 edge of a board and flatten 1 side of a board and is not intended to be used to clean up a cut of an improperly set up TS what tool do you suggest using to insure a parallel glue edge on the opposite side of the board?
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That's what a planer is for. After you joint one side, you can plane the opposite side using the jointed side as a guide.
Leon wrote:

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LOL
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I can see it now. A 4"x3/4" board going through your planer on edge. Yeah...Right.

a
clean
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