Help Me Figure Out How to Do This

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Especially considering the price difference, not even thinking of all the weight considerations and space considerations of a table saw.
BTW, don't know how much you've been using your Domino, but have you experienced any dulling of the bit? Can they be sharpened or do would then need to be replaced?
Also, bought myself a Dremel MultiMax about two weeks ago. As I was using it to shave the edge of a piece of acrylic to fit a 140mm fan opening on my computer, I had all sorts of scenarios popping into my head as to where else I might use it. My only problem is that it seems to be a relatively new product on the market and I'm having a little trouble finding tool stores that carry many of the blade accessories. Guess that will change over time.
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I could see contractors using the new saws over dragging a contractors saw to the job site.

AAMOF In the last couple of days I cut 168 mortises with it for a bedroom project. I was assembling 2 tower cabinets and using dominos to place and attach 4 fixed shelves to 4 sides to each of 2 cabinets. The last is being glued up this morning. I am using 32 dominos to hold the final glue up together and they are located in 12 different locations on each tower. Every thing has to fit perfectly. I was shocked that I did not have to leave out or adjust any dominos because of an alignment problem during the trial dry fit.
I have seen no sign of the bit dulling and I have probably cut a couple thousand mortices with this particular 5mm bit. IIRC the bit is carbide. I understand that they can be resharpened however there is no adjustment in how they fit. The Domino has specific depth settings that may be affected by a "significantly" shorter bit. The multiple depth settings allow slightly deeper holes than indicated to make room for glue. FWIW, the Domino comes/came with a 5mm bit. The Domino tennon assortment that I purchased also included a complete bit set with the 5,6,8, &10mm bits, so I have 2, 5mm bits, the size that I use the most.

I have had the Multimaster for several years now and find that I use it more and more. In fact I had it ready during the dry fit of the above mentioned project in case there were any misalignment problems with the dominos. I was going to sand the domino "thinner" on one end. Fortunately it was not needed. I find that it makes a lot of small "impossible' jobs possible with little effort. I have seen a decent collection of spare blades, etc. at Home Depot. You might look at Amazon for replacements. I'll be trying out the Dremel blades on my next purchase as I understand they will fit the Fein as do the Bosch blades. And both brands are way less expensive than the Fein brand.
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Interesting.
I wonder if they've (saw mfgrs), collectively, done and released studies of who uses each saw for which kind of cut -- say: a TS -- what % of the time is it used for ripping, cross-cutting, dadoes, miters, etc., etc.
Should help them determine what the market potential is for an additional capability, on a lower priced model (eg, circ vs. ts)....
Having just received my new Bosch 4100DS ... yesterday ... I'm not changing over any time soon ;-)
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Interesting.
I wonder if they've (saw mfgrs), collectively, done and released studies of who uses each saw for which kind of cut -- say: a TS -- what % of the time is it used for ripping, cross-cutting, dadoes, miters, etc., etc.
Should help them determine what the market potential is for an additional capability, on a lower priced model (eg, circ vs. ts)....
Having just received my new Bosch 4100DS ... yesterday ... I'm not changing over any time soon ;-)
Well for now, these saws are not the things you will see a framer using, I hope. They tend to be very precise and typically cause no tear out in plywood. For the most part they will be the same price or a bit more than the typical bench top saw, and perhaps equal to half the price of a contractor saw on legs. If I were considering a saw for job site precice cutting it would be one of the new circle saws, they have few size of material limitations and probably cut better than most bench top TS's.
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Upscale wrote:

...... and cost as much as a table saw. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

Yep, Coastal wants as much for the deWalt as I paid for my table saw.
Note that the deWalt is a 6-1/2" saw, not 7-1/2, and has a full quarter inch less cut depth than a Skil 77. That means that you can use up a quarter of an inch of height building a jig for it and end up with the same depth of cut. That's in the "easy to do with some Masonite" category.
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Yup, can't dispute that. Convenience usually costs.
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Or, you could simply bend it down a bit.
John Martin
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Bend cast iron, John? :-)
--

-MIKE-

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propane and a flamethrower torch and you are in business! LOL
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You forgot the sledge hammer to bend it when it's hot and then the crazy glue to reattach the piece that you broke off with the sledge hammer.
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-MIKE- wrote:

By loosening the wing bolts slightly. I'd use masking tape.
--

dadiOH
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Yes, bend cast iron. Cold. It doesn't bend much, but it does bend. And you don't need much of a bend.
Pretty common way to correct warped jointer fences, among other things.
John Martin
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Guess I'd be worried about not knowing where it would bend. I'd be afraid of putting a curve in the top.
In any case, the "tape shim" method seems to do the trick.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

Shim the top edge of the wing. "Care and Repair of Shop Machines" by John White recommends using pieces cut from aluminum cans for shim stock for this application. Put the shims above the bolts. Cut the shims flush with a chisel after you get the table flat. (This technique worked for me.)
Dan
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