HELP: making boards from a tree trunk

About ten years ago I cut down a "Silver Dollar" eucalyptus tree in my front yard. I cut the trunk into rounds about 18" - 24" long, the diameter ranged from 14" to maybe 20". I tried splitting them right afterwards for firewood, but the stuff was tough as magic nails, and didn't split at all. So I threw them in my sideyard and let them sit since. The other day I noticed the rounds were covered with fungus and looked weathered. "Lightbulb: spalted wood".
So I hauled a small round into my woodshop and tried to saw a flatsawn board off to see all the pretty grain and stuff, using a bow saw with a rough ripping blade (I got no other means). An hour later, I'd made a cut maybe 1" deep into the end of the log. The sawdust looked like it came from a fresh log, and the wood is still hard and tough. This method isn't efficient, and that dog won't hunt.
Any better way to mill boards from these rounds? I have a light-duty chain saw, but don't see that working either. I can't imagine a saw mill would take such a small job, or that it would be economically feasible.
Sacramento - Fairfeild area, CA
Thanks a heap, Zz
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Zz Yzx wrote:

Find someone with a 20" or bigger bandsaw?
Chris
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Zz Yzx wrote:

Try cutting from the side rather than across the end. Most saws will cut better this way. Chain saws cut so fast this way that they clog up on shavings so it is better to cut diagonally rather than straight lengthwise.
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Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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If it really was a ripping blade it sounds like it needs to be sharpened. It should have big teeth, four teeth per inch (TPI) would be about right I would think. You need big teeth for resawing.
You can make one of these:
http://www.hyperkitten.com/woodworking/frame_saw.php3
A good hardwood is best, but Doug fir would probably do.
Taking to someone with a bandsaw would be my first choice, if one were available.
You could also take up bowl turning...
--
FF

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[...]
I've been working with similar small sized logs and over time milling them into small boards. What I've been doing is splitting the logs into quarters with a wedge and maul. You mentioned you had tried splitting the logs, not long after they had initially been cut, but didn't have any success. If they're dry now, they may split better.
Once I have my log in quarters, if the wood is dry enough, I'll then anchor a piece to some scrap plywood with a couple of screws one of the rough flat sides and then run it through the bandsaw. Flip the piece around to the other rough flat, anchor to the plywood again, and run it through again. At the point I should have two relatively flat sides to my log quarter and I no longer need the plywood to act as a sled going through the bandsaw. Now I can just flip the quarter back and forth slicing off pieces. I then wind up with quarter sawn pieces of whatever I've got. The pieces are small--but that's fine for what I use it for.
If you don't have a bandsaw, you might try checking to see if you've got a local woodworking or turning group in your area and see if someone in the group has a bandsaw that would be willing to help.
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