Help identify these chisels.


Take a look at these chisels.
http://tinyurl.com/bee9q
What are they for? Why are they curved? What are the triangular thing and the pry bar looking thing for?
I'm going to list them on ebay cause I will never use them but I've never seen chisels like these before.
JB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@msn.com wrote:

They're not chisels, they're scrapers. Used by machinists for scraping in new bearings.
John Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks. Judging from the interest in this set on ebay it's not worth my time to list them.
http://tinyurl.com/bqmql
I had no idea what these were.
JB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24 Aug 2005 19:01:30 -0700, the opaque snipped-for-privacy@msn.com clearly wrote:

For $30.81 shipping, you -might- have found out. Frackin' OUCH!
---------------------------------------------------------- --== EAT RIGHT...KEEP FIT...DIE ANYWAY ==-- http://www.diversify.com/stees.html - Schnazzy Tees online ----------------------------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As stated by John Martin these appear to be scrapers used by machinists for fitting in new bearings in their housings. The scrappers I have used are usually padded at the end of the handle so you do not hurt your hip when pushing. The handles are normally padded with rope or tape to ensure a good grip for day long usage. The scrapers shown may have never been used. The steel used in making scrapers is of high quality and harder than the material being scraped. Judging by the photos these scrapers may or may not be of premium steel quality for scraping steel all day long. Conversely these tools may have been designed for removing mechanical parts from their housing. For me to place a bid on these would require a visual check to verify the quality of the steel and possibly their origin. At one time makers of scrapers would stamped their logo and sometime the date and place. FWIW
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Denis Marier wrote:

Denis:
The bearing scrapers are most often used sideways, inside a bearing. Since you're not pushing endwise as you would be in scraping a flat surface, grabbing the tang is not a problem.
I recall seeing these sometimes with Navy markings on the box.
John Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They're files.
Bob S.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Files? They have no teeth. Are you kidding with me? JB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
with me? ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ They WERE files. They are shaped like files, but have had the teeth ground off, so they can be used as scrapers, as John Martin says.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi other Leo
Yes that's exactly what I thought, not sure about the wavy ones, spring steel maybe ?
Have fun and take care Leo Van Der Loo
Leo Lichtman wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Had another look at the pic's, maybe just bend files, can't tell for sure in the one picture.
Leo Van Der Loo wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leo Lichtman wrote:

I don't think they ever were files, but they came very close to it.
In Sheffield, lots of file makers also made scrapers. An identical file blank would be taken off the line before the teeth were cut, curved and then sharpened and polished. The steel requirements are the same and many of the shapes are similar.
In the workshop, it was traditional to make your wown scrapers from old files by annealing them, filing the old teeth off, bending to shape, then re-hardening and sharpening as a scraper.
As these appear to have no trace of file teeth at all, I think they were made as scrapers. Usually when re-cycling files into scrapers you just take the teeth off around the edges and flatten the tops a little. The remaining teeth make a good chequered grip.
The box is unusual - it's carefully made to store curved scrapers without damaging their edges, yet it doesn't seem to leave space for handles. This is the work of someone who looked after their tools more than their hands - a bare file/scraper tang stuck in the palm is a nasty injury.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The curved ones typically are called "riflers" and I'm not positive on that spelling. The others - save one - all have the shape of standard files. And no - you can't really see that they don't have any teeth and you never said that in your original post. So no - I wasn't kidding you and as someone else mentioned, they may have started out as files.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.