Help: Ideas for assembling rafter units with plywood gussets

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On Fri, 02 Jul 2004 05:10:05 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"
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For the above reasons, if I was building a glued joint I wanted to rely on, and using nails, hammered or phutt-haaed, I would clamp the joint first.
I also reckon that screws _would_ add significant strength and felxibility to a joint.
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vaguely proposed a theory

Check the shear values for the screws before you decide they are better than nails. For a true truss, all joints are either in compression or tension so the only real use for the gusset is to hold the pieces together. A pin connection is all that is required there and nails should be sufficient.
-Jack
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THANKS! For the many suggestions-- I'm about to start and I'll post the results. Right now I plan to try both nail-glue-flip-over and Jig-in- final-position. I have 17 32 foot wide trusses, and I'll know for sure pretty soon what works...
Right now I plan a few screws for good glue line compresion, and the high shear strength nails for 'insurance..'
Regards, Terry King ...In The Woods In Vermont snipped-for-privacy@terryking.us "The one who dies with the most parts LOSES! What do you need??"
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Take pictures, please.
Patriarch
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and also quite a bit on the tooling and jigs I have put together. I also have photos of the crane I made that goes on the front of my truck and which I used to position the posts and beams single-handedly, up to the four 8x12 inch 16 foot main beams, which weighed 520 pounds each.
http://terryking.us/public/barn/truckframe.htm has a couple photos of the crane.
If there's enough interest I will put some web thing together, sort of like "ShoeString Post and Beam" etc.
Thanks for all the ideas! I got several here that were, um, better than mine...
--
Regards, Terry King ...In The Woods In Vermont
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How many nails, on both sides, will go into each gusset? APA has a booklet on ridged frame construction, in it they caution about splinting the members with the nails. As I recall, spacing was about 3" oc. They recommended a template, one for each side for nail spacing. Drilled holes and spray paint.
Terry King wrote:

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inches. The 3 inch number seems pretty close, then.
I'll use the template idea, for placing consistency. I plan to have the 'other side' pattern intersperse the nails between the 'first side'. The plan and I are using 2 1/2 inch concrete nails. They're about, um, (looking for one, trying it in the Drill Index holes...) 3/16 inch diameter. Boy, they DO look serious, with fluted sides and all. They're heat treated and I bet have a lot (technically speaking) of sheer strength.
The plan doesn't require glue, but I like glued joints, and I have 2 new gallons of a substance I won't bring into discussion on this group this month...
--
Regards, Terry King ...In The Woods In Vermont
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Why not use bolts? You could fasten both sides at once. The extra time it takes to drill for a bolt would be offset by not having to flip the whole thing over. Pile up all of your plates and drill them all at the same time. A lag bolt and an impact wrench should make very quick work of it. My guess is 1/4" bolts would be plenty heavy.

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

** I'm pretty far along with this, now. 7 of 17 trusses are up, most are prefabbed and ready. I am assembling in place, with 3 support points. I'll put some photos up in a few days.
Re: Nails/Bolts etc.-- There are 92 * 17 = 1564 nails in this set of gambrel trusses. Nails are a LOT faster than the other fastener possibilities.
I did make templates to mark the nail positions in each gusset, and they are set up so opposing nails are in different locations and well spaced. No splits seen so far...
--
Regards, Terry King ...In The Woods In Vermont
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I built a gambrel trussed roof for my barn in 1976 with my 12 year old son doing most of the nailing. I set up four sawhorses on fairly level ground. Screwed first truss to the horses and used this as a jig for my son to nail and glue the plywood gussets to the framing.I actually could have used six saw horses as this design used a center (king post) post to the ceiling joists. I just added a 4x4 under the points where I needed another horse. I cut all the 3/4" plywood gussets , all framing lumber and then left for work . My son nailed one complete truss, then got my wife and daughter to help take the truss off the jig. Then he would start the next one. He completed 19 trusses by the time I started to set them.These trusses had gussets on one side only, subfloor adhesive and 10d nails, hand nailed in those days.I would think that with careful handling during the lift you will not need gussets on both sides.The gussets on the other side could be nailed in place if you think they are neccesary.I am not an engineer but I believe 3/4" plywood gussets of a decent size are adequate on one side of the truss. The barn has been up 29 years and has been converted into a house after I sold the farm. mike
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On 25 Jul 2004 22:25:53 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@netzero.com (mike) wrote:

set up your truss jig at the end of the building with the top of the truss pointing away from the building. nail off the gussets on one side, then stand the truss up against the building and nail off the other side. then lift the truss to the top plate and stage it for the stack starting from the far end, so you don't have to carry over the trusses that are already up there.
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