Help Id'ing a lathe

Does anyone have any info on lathe or the cutting tool used in the following links?
http://tinyurl.com/3d4m7
http://tinyurl.com/2nbdw
How about the type of joints used in the following links:
http://tinyurl.com/253kj
http://tinyurl.com/2jn23
Thanks for any help that you all can give,
John
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The lathe looks very much like a basic, cheap chinese lathe sold by a number of budget tool companies. Usually 4-speeds.
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Saweyes is right - these lathes are badged and marketed in the UK by people like Clarke and Machine Mart. I picked one up at an auction a number of years ago, reckoning that at least it would do for turning doorknobs etc. However it is just plain nasty, and has no saving graces at all, other than its cheapness. The beds are flimsy square light-gauge steel tube, the headstock is pressed steel and has only one bearing, the toorest adjustments use single-start bolts, so the adjusting handles have to spin through 360 deg, so they often foul the headstock/tailstock. The tool rest height adjustment uses a radio-type knob, which makes it almost impossible to tighten it enough to secure the toolrest unless you have fingers like mole-grips. I couldn't get rid of it quickly enough, and would earnestly advise you to have nothing to do with it - you'll either outgrow it or become terminally frustrated with it within a week.
As for the tool, I can't see one in the pictures, only the toolrest, so I assume that the turner would have used either a scraper or a roughing gouge on the outside and a scraper or a bowl gouge on the inside.
The joints used in the coopered work are called bird-mouth joints (in UK, at least). They're mechanically stronger than plain butt joints and also increase strength by giving a larger gluing area.
HTH
Frank

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Thanks for all the great info, frank. Much appreciated.
John

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Tool used was most likely a gouge or skew, depends on the user. I'd say gouge. As for the lathe, that tag looks suspiciously like "Central Machinery"; i.e. Harbor Freight cheapo lathe. Avoid.

Birdsmouth. Probably cut with a router bit - there's a company that makes them specifically for segmented and "coopered" style joints, although I can't remember who it is - maybe I've seen them in Woodcraft.

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Lee Valley carries a couple of different ones.
djb
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Also, do a search on stave construction.
UA100
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