Help, I don't understand!!!!

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Hi Woodworkers, I have a little problem, I find it difficult to understand English USA you see I live in England. Would anybody have a Dictionary to translate English USA to English UK.
Jo
The impossible I can achieve miracles take a little longer
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--WebTV-Mail-28428-2363 Content-Type: Text/Plain; Charset=US-ASCII Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit
Just read your dictionary upside down or backwards-------George
--WebTV-Mail-28428-2363 Content-Description: signature Content-Disposition: Inline Content-Type: Text/HTML; Charset=US-ASCII Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit
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josoap wrote:

I get that funny feeling that this will be followed up by another pitch for "free.uk.woodworking", which in my reader then shows up as "f.u.woodworking" which I have to admit I find pretty amusing.
PK
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Try this one. http://cgi.peak.org/~jeremy/retort.cgi Click on "American" at the top to go from Yank to Brit.
Art
Hi Woodworkers, I have a little problem, I find it difficult to understand English USA you see I live in England. Would anybody have a Dictionary to translate English USA to English UK.
Jo
The impossible I can achieve miracles take a little longer
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I thank you for that, now I can cope with this news group, Cheers Wood Butcher.
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I think there is one.. they call it some funny sounding name, like the Declaration of Independence, I think..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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My jointer is your planer. My planer is your thicknesser. My toilet is your 'loo / WC. My flashlight is your torch. Elevator -> Lift. Customize -> Bespoke. Wrench -> Spanner. Hood -> Bonnet. Truck -> Lorry.
ad naseum. Just post specifics and we'll translate for you.
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"Patrick Conroy" wrote in message

Trunk -> Boot Crescent Wrench -> Shifting Spanner
... and then there's Cockney slang, which could take up a whole thread for months.
--
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A pasty's made from pastry. A pastie is normally tasseled.
Plural is the same.
Aroma differs.
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"Plural is the same."
Ah that brings up a major difference between Americans and our British cousins. The Brits don't seem to get subject-verb agreement. I cringe every time I hear a BBC reporter tell me that "Manchester United are at Arsenal for a friendly this Saturday." A collective noun is still singular.
Dick Durbin
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OTOH, the name of the language *is* "English". On that basis, I think one could make the argument that the British usage is _by_definition_ the correct one.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Or I could make the argument that the British usage is merely old-fashioned. :)
Dave
Doug Miller wrote:

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"Living language" versus "strict constructionist?"
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Doug Miller wrote:

By that definition we should speak Old English.

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So the U.S. sportscasters should be saying "The 'Philadelphia Eagles' _is_ at Miami Sunday " ?
Or "'The Doors' *is* at Madison Square Garden Wednesday"?
Yes, collective nouns are singular. None of "Manchester United", "Arsenal", "Philadelphia Eagles", or "The Doors" are collective nouns, however. They are proper names.
Singularity/plurality of proper names, especially names of _groups_, is a *tricky* subject.
The name can refer to the group, as a single entity, *OR* it can refer to the individuals that make up the group, _collectively_.
The former is singular, the latter is plural. REGARDLESS of the 'apparent' single-ness or plural-ness of the name itself.
e.g.: "The Beatles is a British musical group." "The Beatles are British musicians."
"The Chicago Fire is a soccer team." "The Chicago Fire are leading New York by 2."
BOTH are grammatically correct.
"Manchester United are at Arsenal..."
is no more wrong than
"The Chicago Fire are at Detroit for the first-round play-offs on Thursday." or "The Browns are at Mile High Stadium for their pre-season game, on Monday."
It 'sounds funny' to _your_ ear, because "Manchester United" is not an obvious plural form. But, neither is "Red Sox", and you wouldn't say "The Red Sox _is_ leading 5-2 in the bottom of the seventh", would you?
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(Robert Bonomi) wrote:

Well, last year we might have. This year, they ain't doing quite as well... <g>
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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in 1203267 20050505 005959 snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote:

Steady on, old chap !
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That's because Sox is the homophone/homonym for the plural of "sock."
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On Tue, 03 May 2005 16:29:53 GMT, Patrick Conroy

I've heard enough jokes and watched enough Monty Python to understand most US/UK translations. The only one I really don't get, is Wrench/Spanner. Most of the other ones are just a different (older?) term for the same thing. Hood/Bonnet makes sense. An Elevator elevates you, a lift lifts you. Wrenches wrench things. Span is something that connects or encompasses two things. I would think this would be a better term for a screw, or maybe a ruler.
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"Fenrir Enterprises" wrote in message

Make perfect sense ... a "spanner" works by precisely 'spanning' two parallel surfaces of a nut. A "shifting spanner" is adjustable in its span.
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