HELP: Gluing corners of a radiator cover?

Hello,
I'm new to working with wood, so I figured I'd start with a basic project.
I found plans for a radiator cover on the Internet at http://www.easy2.com/cm/easy/diy_ht_index.asp?page_id5694140
The corners of the radiator cover (essentially a box) are glued, and then reinforced with wood screws. I had a teacher from high school shop class always discouraged us from using fasteners if we could avoid it. Is wood glue strong enough to hold the corners of the box together without cutting some kind of a joint? If not, could I use L-fasteners on the inside to hold it? Any suggestions?
Thanks!!!
--Virgil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Virgil Kent wrote:

Use screws. Radiator covers continually go from hot to cool and back. One of the joints is edge to end grain, which probably wouldn't hold at all without screws under these conditions. "L" brackets probably wouldn't be a bad idea.
I would probably use pocket holes, like this: <http://www.kregtool.com/pocket_hole_applications.asp
The most you'd need is this: <http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pF271&cat=,46275>
While $60 is a lot for one project, pocket holes are very handy in finish carpentry. Even if you're only making a few radiator covers, you'd probably get your money's worth.
Metal fasteners are sometimes discouraged in fine furniture. Using them in finish carpentry is usually a good idea.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mon, Jan 17, 2005, 12:38pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (VirgilKent) asks: <snip> Any suggestions? Glue blocks.
JOAT Charity ain't giving people what you wants to give, it's giving people what they need to get. - Albert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd use screws. Drill a 3/8" hold about 3/8" deep, set the screw and then plug the hole.
Sometimes you need a mechanical fastener. Or a more complex joint.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I discourage fasteners too. I'm not sure what tools you have. Do you have clamps? A corner butt joint needs to be reinforced with glue blocks, biscuits or fasteners. A rabbet is an improvement but still may require fasteners. A box joint is much easier to make than a dovetail joint and is very strong because it have more glue surface area.
On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 12:38:47 GMT, Virgil Kent

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phisherman wrote:

Why?
This is trim, not fine furniture.
I'm interested in hearing your thoughts.
Thanks, Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 18:01:51 GMT, B a r r y

The downside is that you need to hide the ugly fasteners with plugs, then the plugs may fall out in time (round plugs do not stay round). Sometimes metal fasteners rust and discolor wood, although you can use stainless steel screws. I can understand using fasteners for a beginner woodworker with few tools, but you gain little in developing skills in traditional joinery. Other joints to consider include the miter joint (with glue block for added strength)--compound, biscuited, splined, keyed, rabbeted, and locked to name a few.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phisherman wrote:

I can agree with that.
Usually I prefer brads or pocket holes in unseen areas on trim, which don't require plugging.
I know how to do the other stuff, but I'm always interested in other views. Radiator covers are pretty extreme duty for wood, and you never know when somebody's got a better idea.
Thanks! Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for all the great advice!
---Virgil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.