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Never offended Jerry. I've been there several times and thoroughly enjoy the place, people and language.     mahalo,     haole
Jerry Gilreath wrote:

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while
where
[ Ahhh! Looks like another smart-aleck joins the ranks. ] Dan, you'll fit right in! In fact, c'mon up here to the front row...
Please be sure to ask questions like: a) Which table saw should I buy? b) Is Harbor Freight any good? c) Should I buy a router table? d) What's BORG and who's SWMBO? e) Grizzly, is that a real bear next to Dan Haggerty? f) Why do you folks pick on Norm, so much? g) What's wrong with my penchance to purchase Craftsman power tools? h) Is quartersawn SYP worth the $11/BF I've been quoted?
and finally, please inquire about i) Free plans -- Where can I find them?
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On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 19:23:23 +0000, mttt wrote:

You forgot about all the 'lectrikal stuff, static caused dust collector explosions, the mayhem and blood and gore from PVC air lines, what did I say to cause everyone to say "I suck", why did you post a picture of a cat whand call it a pushstick, why are you guys so tough on BAD, .......
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wrote:

Which reminds me of a Grizzly story, totally unrelated...
When hiking in the north country it pays to be aware of bears. Knowing that bears are usually reclusive, hikers will often wear things like bells and bright-colored clothing to warn of their approach.
One should be aware that there are two main types of bears to be concerned with; the Brown bear and the Grizzly. Professionals such as Forest Rangers know that a hiker can usually tell what kind of bear is inhabiting the area they're hiking by examining any observed scat.
Although both bears are omnivorous, Rangers familiar with both species know that the Brown bear is more vegetarian in their eating habits and their scat will be heavily laced with undigested vegetable matter. The Grizzly's, on the other hand, will be more likely to include large amounts of little bells and orange cloth.
Happy Hiking! Michael
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YA YA YA,..... they all shit in the woods.OK I've come to the conclusion that you are all a bunch of bastards and i love you all,... sniff * wipes a tear,.......finally feels like home.
"Michael Baglio @nc.rr.com>" <mbaglio<NOSPAM> wrote in message

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On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 04:18:05 GMT, Michael Baglio

Ackshally, Michael, brown bears are grizzlies. The other kind of bear is the American Black Bear. BTW, the other identifying characteristic of grizzly scat is that it smells like pepper (capsicum, Groggy).
Luigi Who really has had a close encounter with a grizzly. Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

Absolutely right about the types of bears. Thank you for sharing, and no, I don't want to know how you know this. Dave in Fairfax
--
reply-to doesn't work
use:
daveldr at att dot net
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brought forth from the murky depths:

Whew! I'm glad you said "smelled" there. =:0
This reminds me of the old bear escape story.
My buddy and I were wandering through the woods when a huge Grizzly bear came running up at us.
My buddy was a macho fool and thought he could scare the bear, so when it stood up on its two hind legs, raised its paws, and growled at him, my buddy did the same thing toward the bear. It immediately swatted his head off and turned toward me.
Meanwhile, I had been running down the path. The large Griz, who moved about 3 times faster than I could, soon caught up and raised his front paws as he growled in my ear. I darted off to one side and the bear went skidding on past.
I ran the other way and the bear soon caught up with me again. As he raised his paws and growled loudly, I darted off to the other side and the bear went skidding on past.
We repeated this a third time before the bear tired of me, ate my buddy, and walked off into the forest. And that's how I lived through all that.
"Why did the bear go skidding on past me every time I ran sideways?" you ask. Well, he got so close that I could smell his breath (the berries and fish he had eaten before he got to think of me as a meal) as he growled at me. That literally scared the shit out of me...
...and the bear went skidding on past.
========================================================= Save the + http://www.diversify.com Endangered SKEETS! + Web Application Programming =========================================================
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Did I tell you the one about the rooster and a 4 legged bovine,forget it. It's just your basic cock and Bull story anyway.

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wrote:

Damn. Did I misspell Black _again?_ ;> M-
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I thought the brown bear was a kodiak,they make cameras out of them "Michael Baglio @nc.rr.com>" <mbaglio<NOSPAM> wrote in message scribbled

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There are several varieties of brown bear. The formal Latin for the brown bear is "Ursus Arctos". Both the "Kodiak" and "Grizzly" are 'forms' of the brown bear, and are "sometimes considered separate species" -- Ursus Middendorffi, and Ursus Horribilis, respectively.
Calling them separate "breeds" (about as different as a cocker spaniel and a springer spaniel) wouldn't be far off the mark.
The North American Black Bear (Ursus Americanus) is a separate, albeit closely related, species. Similar to a coyote vs. a dog.
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On Mon, 22 Dec 2003 02:45:51 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) scribbled

You're right about brown bears, and the European version is also the same species.

Not that closely related. Even though coyotes (Canis latrans), wolves (C. lupus) and dogs (C. familiaris) are considered different species, they can and do interbreed when they are not busy eating each other. Grizzlies and Black bears do not, and AFAIK, cannot.
Luigi Whose friends are currently keeping their dogs indoors lest they end up as lunch for a wolf pack that is currently hanging out around Whitehorse. Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
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On Thu, 18 Dec 2003 22:46:23 -0330, "Dan Parrell"

Hi Dan, welcome to the group. Just wondered where ur from in eastern Canada? Ken makin dust in NS (near Hfx)
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