Hello (again) but I have a question

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Yes -- but houses built prior to that requirement don't all follow it. And frankly, some contractors don't seem to see a difference between 6" and 18" when it comes to things like that. There are lots of places where it's not allowed at all.
Scott Lurndal wrote:

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On 1/5/2006 7:00 PM Mike Berger mumbled something about the following:

Must be an awful lot of gas fumes then since gasoline needs approx a 14:1 ratio for combustion (litte more, little less works, but not a whole lot more/less). With a typical 2 car garage having about 3000 cu ft of space, that means it would need about 200 cu ft of fumes, which is an awful lot of gasoline to create that amount of fumes. Remember, it isn't gasoline itself that is flammable, it's the fumes.
--
Odinn
RCOS #7 SENS BS ???
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That's combustion. A lot of hydrocarbon vapors have a LEL (lower explosion limit) concentration of about 1 to 1.5 percent by volume in air. Let's use 1 percent as an example since I don't have a calculator and will be doing the limited math in my head. That 1 percent is about 30 cubic feet of vapor in your garage.
One pound mole of a material occupies about 360 cu ft at standard temperature and pressure. So 30 cubic feet is about 1/12 of a pound mole. Something like benzene has a molecular weight of 78, so a pound mole of benzene weighs 78 lbs. 1/12 of 78 is about 6.5 lbs, which is just about a gallon of benzene. (I think benzene is about 6.2 lbs/gal, but not sure on this.)
The other consideration is just where you knock the can over in relationship to the ignition source. If it is at the far end of the garage, a gallon of benzene will probably not reach LEL near the pilot light. Knock it over next to the pilot light, and you'll be doing your impression of a flaming marshmallow.
Science, the other red meat.
Regards, Roy
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David wrote:

Interesting point.
Here in New England, our furnaces and water heaters are typically in the basement. We worry about sawdust and fumes, but never hear of a problem.
In Florida, where construction is probably similar to Dave's area, every one of my relatives has a gas-fired furnace and water heater in the garage. The same garage contains cars, lawn mowers, weed wackers, dirt bikes, and 99 other gasoline powered devices.
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How tight and well-insulated are the garages in florida?
B a r r y wrote:

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Mike Berger wrote:

You are "out of gas" Mike. <g>
Dave
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Mike Berger wrote:

One of them is insulated and air conditioned. <G>
Barry
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Where does it get its burn air?
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving
"B a r r y" <keep_it_in_the_newsgroup snipped-for-privacy@thankyou.com> wrote in message
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wrote:

Well duh, inside the building... It's obviously not an airtight submarine. <G>
My indoor, basement located, oil fired furnace and water heater, here in New England, also draw burn air from the inside of the building.
Are you guys going to tell me it dosen't, just like the 1/2 space breakers that didn't exist? <G>
Barry
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not all do though. my propane heater gets it's burn air from the outside.
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On Fri, 6 Jan 2006 15:32:02 -0700, "Charles Spitzer"

I agree. Some do, some don't. Variations in installations are huge, especially in different locales.
I lived in a home built in 1980 that had an oil-fired furnace in the garage, 6 feet from a car, with three underground walls, an insulated front wall, and a family room over it, that drew burn air from inside the garage.
I just spent two days in another thread being told I was imagining things in my electrical panel. <G>
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I have a water heater in my garage as well but it is a sealed unit and gets it's combustion air form the outside and I would bet that most of theirs are of the same type.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving
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Geeze I just wanted an opinion on using a woddstove in my garage. I didn't expect all this debate. I gues what I gather from all this malarchy is that I can put the stove in the garage, just as long as I don't use gasoline by the gallon for cleaning the oil spills, RIGHT? I figured on the "ole' guys in here to say, "Iv'e been using a stove in my garage for 50 years" or the like. And I still didn't get a rebuttal on my mobility base question.
Thanks
Searcher, Still searching for an answer
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