heavy picture frame

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no. at 6sqft, it will be at least 10 lbs of glass + lead, so say 15lbs.
you can do a spline for a lot more strength.
regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/ChaniArts
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Even without contrasting wood this looks very nice when done.
http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip010511sn.html
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Do a spline. Make a jig that is like an upside-down U that rides your table saw fence. One side has a tall face. This you can use as a tenoning jig btw. To that face you attach a 45 degree block. This allows you to first assemble the frame just with glue on the miters. Then after that has cured you run the corners through on edge. Make sure you use a blade that makes a square cut at the top like one of the cutters from your dado set. Then you make a 1/8" spline with the grain running across the joint. I attach a sacrificial strip of wood on the edge of the 45 degree block every time I change the cut so there is no tearout on the back side of the cut. You'll have to supersize the jig to handle a frame this big but it will work.
-Kevin
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A mitered bridle joint solves both the strength and appearance problems - this is the only example I found on Google images:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/8208
Good luck!
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Elrond Hubbard wrote:

That's almost the joint I was talking about, but the tenon doesn't go all the way through.
That's a *very* thick tenon, btw.
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I agree - I'd go for thirds.
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Splined miters. Lots of good long-grain to long-grain glue surface.
scott
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Mark, many years ago I used to do stained glass. A good stained glass piece will have its own frame to hold every thing together. Your frame should only be for decoration and should not have to add any support what so ever. What you will need to do is "securely" attach the top of the frame you build to the top of the stained glass frame. Technically you should not need sides or a bottom to your frame.
Having said that if you want the stained glass to float inside your frame I would biscuit the mitered corners and then drill 2 holes in the top and 2 in the bottom into the corners. Counter sink and plug the holes.
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technically, you don't need the top. the glass and lead panel will sag due to weight. without a bottom support, the panel will wind up on the floor and the top of the lead or zinc glass frame will still be attached to the top piece of the wood frame. the larger the panel, the sooner this will occur.

regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/ChaniArts
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technically, you don't need the top. the glass and lead panel will sag due to weight. without a bottom support, the panel will wind up on the floor and the top of the lead or zinc glass frame will still be attached to the top piece of the wood frame. the larger the panel, the sooner this will occur.
Well I wonder how long that takes to happen. I have 2 pieces in my home that I made in the early 80's that are similar in size and they hang from a chain on each corner, no sag yet.
That said, on larger panels we soldered a support as inconspicousely as possable from the top of the frame to the bottom of the frame.
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On Fri, 30 Jan 2009 06:05:56 -0800 (PST), DejaVoodoo

From an engineering standpoint there is no way to know this. Depends on the frame, thickness, width, wood, size, weight, glue, biscuit size, etc. Biscuits are not the strongest joint, but may or may not be adequate for your application. Get extra strength using metal "L" braces, which you could mortise.
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A Butterfly Dovetail Inlay centered on the miter cut in a contrasting wood also looks nice, and adds strength.

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Biscuits are for placement. Preventing lateral movement while the glue dries. In some softer woods, the biscuit might be stronger.
Martin
DejaVoodoo wrote:

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Mitered half laps,or mitered bridle joints, (sometimes called mitered slip joints), would work.
If your not sure what I'm talking about, search Google images. I pulled up a bunch.
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snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Lots of good info on this page:
http://www.projectwoodworking.com/projectwoodworking05.php
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