heavy-duty levelers


Anybody have a source for heavy duty leveling feet?
The application is to level my currently in-progress workbench. It will be a beast (of the design favored by Frank Klausz in The Workbench Book) except mine will have fully loaded drawers beneath. So it will be *heavy*. I found a couple of small sources, wondering if you guys know of any.
TIA,
Joe C.
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noonenparticular wrote:

Grainger.
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/productdetail.jsp?xi=xi&ItemId11761243&ccitem
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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That would do it, thanks for the recommendation.
jlc

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On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 21:11:26 GMT, "noonenparticular"

the closest hardware store.
get 4 beefy lag bolts, say 5/8 x 12. bore up from the bottom of the leg and run them in so that an inch or so of the head sticks out. tune the bench to level with a wrench.
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noonenparticular wrote:

I skipped the tail vise and went with a Twin Screw. http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/BenchFinishing/CBbench33.html and it's heavy. Unless you like laying on the floor with two wrenches you should try the levelers adjustable from above with an allen wrench. Glued some 80 grit to the bottom so the bench can't slide around on my epoxy coated cement floor.
Cal-Fasteners - photo is close to life size - beefy suckers.
bottom half of this page http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/MT/CBbench20.htm
post pics of your bench when you can please.
charlie b
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wrote:

WOW!
Admitted screw-ups be damned, that is a piece of work!
Beautifully done.
Regards.
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charlie b wrote:

Aw, what the 'l ;-)
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/MT/CBbench20.html
-- Mark
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Wow Charlie.... I was interested in the leveling devices as I am going to build my new large bowl lathe stand soon....
Then I forgot all about it when I saw your bench. What a masterpiece! Not only is it functional and well thought out, but it is gorgeous. Really nice work, sir.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com / Robertwrote:

That I'd bolt to the floor. But if you've got enough mass then these levelers, with the 80 grit sandpaper on the bottom, should get things level and keep it there.

Thanks. You did note that it was a year of elapsed time from start to finish? Was intimdated in handcutting BIG through dovetails on the apron stock - stuff that thick, that wide and that long is hard to come by, at least for me. Fortunately I know an arborist/ sawyer/woodworker who had what I needed but not much more if I screwed up. Was also, uneccessarily, concerned about the Twin Screw installation - again, the jaw stock was hard to come by and there wasn't going to be a second chance.
I'd not do the accessible from both sides of the bench drawers with the guides on the drawer sides. Other than opening and closing them from the back to show off I don't work on that side of the bench so that "seems like a great idea" wasn't. The top shallow drawers, suggested by Michael Baglio, was a great idea and does keep digging down inside them to a minimum.
If I can break a complicated piece down into low risk modules/parts I'm less intimidated by the project. It also lets you evolve the thing as you go rather than commit totally to EVERYTHING right from the get go. Using traditional joinery really lends itself to this approach as it allows you to dry fit what you've got and make subsequent parts/modules/steps fit the actual space it is to occupy. I stumbled on this approach early on while making a pair of wall hanging tool cabinets
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/RightToolCabinet.html
Each step along the way seemed pretty easy, with plenty of opporotunities to try new things - at low risk once the cabinet and the doors were done. When it was all done and filled I did the "Did I make that?".
By the yard it's hard. But by the inch - it's a cinch.
charlie b
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Like these? http://cgi.ebay.com/4-Large-Machine-Leveling-Pads-2-3-8-x-1-2-13-NEW_W0QQitemZ7549612191QQcategoryZ633QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem Joe Brophy CountryTech Computer email: snipped-for-privacy@spiretech.com
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