Heating the Workshop (garage)

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And, as explained in another post, they are not.
The fact that you aren't even aware that there is a difference in "mean", explains the rest of your post, snipped as equally flawed in reasoning.
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"arithmetic mean" -- which is exactly the same as "average". If "geometric mean" is *meant*, then it must be so stated in order to be so understood.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Get on the next chicken little bandwagon now... THE ICE AGE COMETH!
Swingman wrote:

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"Lou Newell" wrote in message

Al has to get his Oscar first.
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Even in that case, the heater has done it's job.
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I'm no expert, but I think that's part of the deal. Here in Wisconsin, we didn't get any snow *at all* until Mid-January, and we've still only got an inch or so on the ground. For comparison, we used to get *deep* snow in this area, and it started in early to mid November every year- sometimes even as early as October or September.
Personally, I don't like it. I don't live this far north to be denied my snow- and I doubt you care much for cold, being a Texan!

In a word, yes. But, it will depend a lot on what heater you have. A heater that vents the CO2 and water vapor (which you should have in an enclosed area anyway) will not be much worse than your home heater. A torpedo heater or a burner screwed onto a tank is going to make for a really moist environment, though. That gets to be a problem if you're repeatedly heating and cooling your shop. You can minimize the effect by coating your tools with wax or top-cote or something, but it's better just to get something that will be vented, IMO.

I couldn't suggest a particular brand, they all seem to be about the same to me- but this style works nicely. http://www.heatershop.com/propane_space_heaters.html As noted above, try and find one that is vented- the ones at this link are all "vent free", but a trip to your local hardware store should turn up some other options.

It sure will. I'm half convinced we have no snow because I finally broke down and bought a snow blower last year. On the upside, you won't have to actually buy any propane.
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I'm going to be looking at the same thing. NH seacoast, 20x20 garage that will be insulated. I saw one of those gray box things heating a clothing store I was in the other day, thought I could use that, but I don't know what to look for, I should have grabbed the name. Anyway, it was a square about 3x3 with hot water pipes circulating through it and a fan behind it that (quietly) blew air out over the coils. I have seen these in commercial garages before. It was mounted up hight in a corner where the walls met the ceiling. Anybody know what I'm talking about?
-Jim
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jtpr wrote:

Try looking up "hydronic unit heater". They need a boiler of some kind to provide the heat source.
Chris
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lucky4fingers wrote:

I have a shop outside that's ostensibly "unheated". I live in a climate that is very cold in the winter, and I mean very cold.
I use a kerosene heater when I'm out there. I go out, start it up, come back for a cup of coffee and go back out to a warmish shed.
If the temperature is above -15 C (5 F) I can get the shed comfortably warm. It's not insulated, or I could likely tolerate a colder outside temperature.
Kerosene is relatively clean, and also pretty easy to use. Some people claim it's smelly but I've had no problems with that once it's up to heat. The issue that i have with it is that it's a bit pricey and I'll likely change to some other form of heat next year. However, it's a good stopgap and it would do a 2 car garage nicely.
Tanus
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Kerosene is what I use. Silent, easy to use and portable. Yes, it's a little more expensive than some alternatives but, here in the Seattle area, it's not needed often enough to justify the cost or bother of installing something else.

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In "my" half of the unheated 2-car garage, the ceiling is insulated and sheetrocked, and the workbench area has a quartz element radiant heater pointed at it. Got it from Woodcraft. It is absolutely silent. If you're standing in the general line of fire of the heater then the environment is bearable. An occasional visit to the kitchen for an insulated mug of hot chocolate also helps but there are days when even the heater and the chocolate do no good. Repeat: you will not warm the room with this thing, you will only warm you if and only if you're standing before the heating elements. I am pleased with it for what it does. It suits my limited purposes.
J.
lucky4fingers wrote:

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A little late getting in on this thread, but I use one a 4000watt Lakewood commercial convection heater. It works great for my 20x24 shop. Where I live this ends up being about $0.32 per hour to run. Seems unbelievably cheap to me, but I also have good insulation in the shop which helps. After a very, very cold night (20's outside) it takes an hour or so to get up to a good workable temp. Not balmy 75 but a decent 50 or so in there.
Prior to owning this I used on of those largish kerosene heaters that warmed the shop quicker, but seemed to eat kerosene even faster. Plus, the hassle of getting and storing the kerosene made me end up purchasing the convection heater.
I also have a couple of those oil filled electric heaters that I use by themselves on days when it's cool, but not frigid. They work great also.
I'm surprised none of the hardcore galoots here said anything about wearing heavier clothes and creating your own heat the old fashioned way! ;-)
Cheers! Dukester
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Un-vented gas and kerosene heaters is dangerous and I not sure the how healthy the fumes are. I know my 80,000 btu propane heater and the kerosene heater I used to use put out black smoke. I now run my propane heater for about 5 minutes to bring my shop up to temp ( 55-60 degrees, unless I'm finishing ) and then I switch to 2 ceiling mount electric heaters ( 18000 btu each - 30amp 220 circuits ). 1000sq foot shop, fully insulated. I add about $10 to $15 a month to my utility bill and I feel this is much safer than a un-vented gas solution. I live in Idaho and propane, natural gas, and electric heated homes run about the same per month for utilities.
On Jan 26, 8:07 am, "Dukester"
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On 26 Jan 2007 07:45:30 -0800, "Dave Herron"

Then you've got a problem with both of them. That's not normal behavior for either a kerosene or a propane heater.

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The smoke is not visible to the naked eye but if you leave a propane or kerosene heater in one spot you will for awhile you will see a black area around the heater.

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use one of those electric heaters exclusively. I have to wait about an hour before it's comfortable in there and if it's below 20, it doesn't get comfortable.
But I don't like the moisture and fumes created by anything that burns, unless it uses outside air for fuel consumption, plus here in town there's lots of codes to break and neighbors to watch out for. The electricity use just hasn't been all that bad. I thought it was going to cost a lot more to run this unit and until the temps dropped just a little while ago, it was keeping that shop nice and toasty.
Family issues and high-priority projects have kept me from insulating properly. This spring it gets done for sure.
And a word of gratitude; after getting a nightstand built to her own specs, SWMBO up and GAVE me her half of the garage and now parks under a pine tree because that's the only spot off the street. Bless her heart. This spring she gets a little carport tarp-and-framework thing just to keep the pine sap off.
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Me too. But the probably know by now that cutting wood and having sex at the same time can be dangerous...
-Jim
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Said John Wayne Bobbitt.

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Dukester wrote:

My shop probably hit -30 C this winter. Hard to work when wearing big mitts to keep my fingers from freezing. :)
Chris
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