Heating a shop

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I have a fully insulated 13'x24' shop that I'd like to install baseboard heat in. Tired of sniffy Kerosene fumes from either the Redi-Heater (to bring it up to temp) or the Kero-Sun heater that keeps it comfy.
Electric heat is my only practical option and I'm well aware of the cost since my entire home is electric baseboard and I've survived 30 years of bills so...<g>
Question I have is I noted at least one gentleman here, Ken Vaughn, has used a "soft heat" hydroponic electric baseboard. Not adverse to going that route but why hydroponic? Is is safer than conventional convection electric baseboard?
Price is about 8 times conventional baseboard and guarantee is 5 years vs. lifetime. I could care less about smooth, even, quiet heat. I just want heat and no open flames.
I realize that sawdust, etc. migrating to the fins and calrod element will likely smell up the place but won't they also with the "soft heat"? Installation and clearances are similar for both.
Bottom line: If the choice is between conventional and hydroponic, am I courting disaster by installing conventional in a shop?
Thanks
Bob
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Unquestionably Confused wrote in

I am thinking wood stove here. I have an all electric place also. I think I would have planty of wood from cutoffs to keep my scrawney butt warm. :-) Course, you may live in a much colder area than I do. I'm in Central Texas.
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Michael Burton responds:

Wood heat is good. A friend does all his heating with wood, in a 24' x 40' shop, and in his 20' x 20' "shed" that he uses for storage and working with welders (steel building, concrete floor, while the shop is wood and wood). But it's a PITA in several ways: you have to be exceptionally careful about the use of finishing materials when heating; you lose more shop space; it can take a long, long time to get a cold shop up to working temperature; firewood storage eats space; hauling your ashes, in this case, is a nuisance.
I know another person, a local instrument maker, who actually planned for wood heat when he built his shop more than a decade ago. He isolated it, because he needs to be able to finish instruments at any time. His wood stove is actually in the basement and heats the shop (the shop and basement are both in the same building, which is not a residence) indirectly, so that sparking off finishes is not a problem. And all the mess is confined to a concrete floored and walled area.
That's central Virginia, and right now we're in a screwy warm spell (67 yesterday, currently [4:30 a.m. or so] about 48), but normally we'd be shivering decently this time of year, though nothing like my days in and around Albany, NY.
Charlie Self "I think we agree, the past is over." George W. Bush
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around
Oh Charlie - you'd love it this year. Not much snow (only a few feet all season long, so far) and the temps over the past week and half to two weeks have been reaching for the 50's. This is Syracuse I'm talking about but Albany is about the same. It's made for some pretty sucky snowmobiling.
--

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"Michael Burton" .

If the shop is in an attached garage, solid fuel heaters are illegal. Even after the fire is "out', there can be embers in the ash the will ignite fumes from solvents.
The scrap I generate in a year would keep my stove going for only a few days. Wood is nice heat, but requires a lot of attention. Keeping the shop heated all the time means lots of trips out there.
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Maybe some places, but they're not illeage in New York.
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You might want to rethink that, in light of the global nature of this newsgroup.
Even within the US, you can't make such a blanket statement. Codes vary wildly.
Kevin
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After checking the building code, check with your homeowner's insurance carrier. *They* won't say 'no' -- they'll say "HELL NO!!!!"
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wrote:

Both my insurance company and my local municipality were satisfied by a visit from the fire marshal and his sign off on our stove. As well, for years I was a volunteer fireman and for part of that time a chief. During that time I attend more than a few house and garage fires. I saw many - many wood stoves in garages. Never once saw an insurance claim denied because of a chimney fire in a garage.
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wrote:

It was a National code, NFPA. I can't find the numbers right now but our local shopper paper used to print it right in the "for Sale" column for stoves and heater. In any case, it is a dumb idea no matter where you live.
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live.
Can't speak to what NFPA might say, because I don't have a copy of it. As to whether it's a dumb idea or not, that's somewhat a matter of opinion. I don't know what it's like around you, but around here it is very common to find wood stoves in attached garages, in wood shops (both pro and home), etc. As I replied to Robert, I have attended a good number of chimney fires (the most common form of wood stove related fires) in the years when I was an active fireman and never saw an insurance claim denied because of a woodstove in an attached garage. Never saw a citation issued for an "illegal" woodstove.
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The reason for not using them in an attached garage is because of potential fumes from a car leaking gas, etc. Detached is not a problme. Woodshops are not a problem, but care with solvents must be exercise, of course.
> Never saw a citation issued for an

That does not mean it never happened.
--
Ed
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I was just reading this and the first thought that comes into my head is 'fire hazard'! Unless you have a state of the art dust collector and sweep the shop daily, you're going to have some sawdust kicking around. Mix that with burning wood... hmmm... doesn't sound to safe to me... In fact, a baseboard heater mounted at floor level doesn't necessarily sound to safe either.
JMHO.
John
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Not as much of a fire hazard as you might first think. Woodstoves are found in garages and woodworking shops of all sorts in a lot of places.
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Unquestionably Confused wrote:

I just use a couple of those cube ceramic heaters when I need them. Most of the time just turning off the air conditioner suffices.
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Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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How I envy you guys. Tomorrow the temperature here will go to 33 deg Celcius

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Alfa wrote:

...
Is that all? :) We'll get that plus another 5-10C come a few months...
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You suck!
Enough already!
You are a mean person!
I have to pay large for a week of thawing out in Punta Cana DR for the missus ("aren't you bringing the laptop so you can keep up on the Wreck, hunnyieee?") and I..... and then I have to raise this stupid little flag so the topless girl can bring me another drink.....
I digress..
Enjoy your thirty-fricking-three-frickin degrees!
00
Rob
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Me too.

I heat mine with a 4800 watt fan-forced construction heater. Paid 69 dollars Canadian for it, and is more than enough. I wired in a wall mounted thermostat. Clean, fast, safe heat. (They also called barn heaters around these parts) Oh... and I have a Workshop air-cleaner (from Lee Valley) on a slow speed all the time. It is sitting in the rafters and moves the heat from the nook throughout the shop.
Even when it gets so cold out that all babies are born with booster cables instead of umbillical cords, that heater does the job.
Of course, in the heat of summer, I only have the heater running part of the time.
00
Rob
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On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 16:42:25 -0500, Robatoy wrote:

Me too, but only paid $20.00 for mine. But thenn, my electric bill went up by $100 last month.
<snip>

You mean not all babies get borned with booster cables?

Lucky you. I guess that's one of the advantages from living in subtropical Ontario (or is it tropical BC?).
--
Luigi
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