Heating A Shop

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Morgans wrote:

Good enough for me.
There are going to be those wanting more proof, like a video.
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Mark

N.E. Ohio
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I do not argue whether it happened or not, I would just like to know the conditions under which it happened! My bet is the heater was very close to the adhesive, a foot or two at the most. Unless it was a Knipco style heater, then a few feet in front of the heater would suffice. Greg
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Here's an excerpt from my posting in the 'building a shop' thread:
Heating: Here's where my friends and I got into a bit of a row. They kept trying to get me to install a wood burner. Granted a wood burner would be cheaper to use (woods plentiful here) but there is no way to extinguish it NOW. Something happens where a bunch of fumes get into the air and I could be a fireball. I opted for a used oil furnace (can't wait to get it installed). Because an oil burner is forced induction I can pull combustion air from outside reducing the explosion / fire hazard. Plus it can be disabled by a breaker or switch.
Stay away from unvented heaters/ heaters that put exhaust back into the workspace. I.E.: Torpedo or catalyst heaters, K1, LPG or natural gas. 1) These put phenomenal amounts of moisture into the air. You would be begging to rust up your tools. What's more important though is 2) what's in the air gets burnt and put back into the air you breath. Lots of the materials we use make fumes that aren't healthy in the first place, heat or burn them changing the compounds into God knows what and your playing a game of roulette.
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There are times one has to offer their credentials to validate their assertions.
I have a degree in Aviation Maintenance and hold a A&P (Airframe and PowerPlant).
Aviation Maintenance is among the most hazardous professions, mostly due to the substances we work with. In this profession (as well as many others) one learns there are long term consequences to chemical exposure. The effects of exposure to many substances is accumulative.
Because there are no apparent ill effects from exposure today does not mean there will be no ill effects tomorrow, next week, month, year or decade.
A breathable atmosphere is no guarantee of safety. I feel a breathable atmosphere is one of the greatest dangers. I lulls the breather into thinking there is no or little danger. Urethane based coatings with a catalyst are an excellent example. Everyone knows to get the hell away and upwind while Emron (i.e.) is being applied, they don't seem to know or care Emron (i.e.) gasses for up to several days. These gasses are breathable but in no way are they healthy.
I don't care to know what vapors turn into when raised to a high temperature or ran through a flame. I will not be exposed to them, or keep my exposure to a minimum if I have to be exposed.
I will note: I no longer work in The Industry. I had become sensitized to widely used substances. It's getting tempting to answer the fliers I get from contracting companies. I love the work but I don't want to get poisoned again.
Explosion hazard? A flash over is more excitement than I care to experience. It wouldn't have to raise the roof, blow out the windows or drop the building. Even if the odds are one in a million Why take a chance? My flesh isn't healthy enough as it is, but I think I want to keep it intact. Burnt or blown off is not an appetizing thought, least for me.
I've become extremely protective of my health. I'm 45. About ten years ago those things I did in my youth started catching up with me. Motorcycle mishaps. Exposure to chemicals. A couple slipped disks from an "encounter" with SWMBO in the shower. :]
If this is what it feels like to be 45 (especially my neck), I'm not into adding to what I've already done. It's going to happen, I'm going to get damaged again, I just know it. I'm not chasing it like I use to.
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Mark

N.E. Ohio
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Amen, brother.
Well put.
--
Jim in NC Recovering from second back surgery.



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Nick Bozovich wrote:

I can get natural gas too, for only $13,500. Whee!
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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wrote:

Brad:
I use a 150,000 BTU kerosene fired salamander heater that is controlled by a portable thermostat (both units from Grainger).
The BTU's would be overkill except that they allow me to spray nitro lacquer in the winter. The lacquer is sprayed in a dedicated spray room with an explosion proof fan taking care of the exhaust. The salamander is in the main part of the shop, near the front doors and the heated air gets into the spray room via holes in the partition wall that are covered with furnace filters.
The salamander puts out enough heat that it can make up for the heated air that is exhausted by the fan.
Another nice thing about having such a powerful heater is that it can bring the shop up to a good working temperature very quickly.
Of course, if I have gluing or finishing to do, the heat has to be left on overnight or the goods have to be stored in the finishing room with some electric heaters on to keep them above sixty,
Sometimes I will plug the thermostat into an appliance timer and set that to come on about an hour before I come into the shop. That's a pretty nice feature on a cold February morning.
The critical thing to remember with the salamander is that it is an open flame heat source. In the warm weather I like to mix up lacquer in the main part of the shop, to keep the spray room less crowded. When the heater is running I do all the mixing in the spray room, with the explosion proof fan running.
I don't do much laminate work anymore but when I do I use the glue that has explosive solvents in it, so that work gets done in the spray room also.
I don't let the dust build up in the shop and I collect most of the dust at the source, so I don't worry about dust explosions.
I saw a grain silo that went up as the result of a dust explosion - hell of a mess.
Regards, Tom. Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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Ahh, a voice of reason when having to use open flame heat in a shop.
--
Jim in NC



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