Heat for small shop

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I'll echo this, based on my own experience. I have a basement shop in upstate NY that's about 8x12 or so, and a quartz radiant heater is just fine. Of course in the basement it never gets below 40-45F, but your well-insulated shop should do OK. With the limited floor space, I often hang my heater on the (cement) wall, but if I were buying a new one, there are some ceiling-mount heaters by Marvin - I believe Lee Valley sells at least one model with a halogen light in it. Even my ceiling space is filling up with stuff, so if you can get a light and heater in one, I'd consider that a valuable use of space. Good luck, Andy
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Thu, Jun 7, 2007, 2:01pm snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (THOMASCLEVELAND) doth claimeth: Hello I'm building a new but small shop, it will be 8' X 10' how ever living in the north east it will get cold up here, it will be insulated, tyvec wrapped and sided, have ac for the summer, but need heat for the winter, I saw and like the "Hot Dog" heaters that hang from the ceiling and run on propane, any input will be gladly welcomed.
You're building it, eh? I wonder then if you realize just how small a 8'X10' shop is going to be, especially after you start putting tools and all in. Unless yoo maybe don[t plan on doing woodworking - you didnt say. My shop is 8'X12' only because that was all I had money to spare for at the time, a choice of something, or nothing. It's uninsulated, but even so, a small electric heater, with a fan, warms it up nicely. I tried one of those electric oil-filled radiator type heaters; worked well enough, but took quite a bit longer than I cared for to get the heat up. If I'd been willing to turn it on, then go back out a 2-3 hours later it should hve served well, but I prefer something a bit faster. The little electric ceramic type heater I have out there now serves well enough.
I'd like to know what you plan on doing in such a small shop. That is if you ever come back, so many seem to ask a question, then never show up again.
JOAT If a man does his best, what else is there? - General George S. Patton
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On Thu, 7 Jun 2007 14:01:08 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (THOMAS CLEVELAND) wrote:

You might consider one of the "motel type" heater/cooling units. It can be mounted through the wall or in a window and if you have power for a window unit, the same will run the heat.
Mike O.
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On Jun 7, 2:01 pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (THOMAS CLEVELAND) wrote:

My insulated, detached, 2 car garage/shop in Detroit heats up on a zero degree day in about half an hour. I use a little electric heater that runs on 220, from Lowes or Home Depot, called "The Hot One" (made by Cadet, I think). I like it a lot - but I think they make smaller units more appropriate for your space.
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RE: Subject
For a shop in the NE, used on an intermittent basis, the MOST IMPORTANT thing will be a good insulation job along with radiant heating.
Electric, operating at 240VAC, would be my choice.
Lew
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THOMAS CLEVELAND wrote:

My shop is 11x14 and not as well insulated as yours. A simple electric heater keeps it at 40 all night. Before breakfast I go out and turn it up. Takes about an hour to raise the temperature to 60 if the outdoor temp is above 20. If it's colder than that I don't want to go out anyway :-).
BTW, when I'm in the shop the heater sits anywhere out of the way. When I'm not it sits on the cast iron tablesaw top. It's always plugged into a GFCI outlet. That way I feel it's pretty safe.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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Lot's of good replies so far. MY .02: Do NOT use any heater that runs on propane, fuel oil, etc that vent into the shop. Safety aside, they ALL generate a lot of water, which will rust everything. Your main goal is to warm yourself, but right behind it is to produce a non-condensing environment for you shop's equipment. That requires some heat above ambient all the time. When your equipment is cold and the air warms up, water condenses out of the air onto those cold surfaces and you get rust.
No one has mentioned warming the floor. I don't know about you, but my feet and lower legs are my main problem when standing in a shop. DO get a heater that has a blower so the floor area can be warmed, not just the top 4 feet of the shop. I use counter-flow (extermally vented) propane furnaces in my shops and they are great. I work several days a month in a shop that has one of those ceiling mounted heaters and it is miserable, as far as I am concerned. It is often 95 degrees 7 feet off the floor and 50 degress or less 2 feet off the floor.
Pete Stanaitis ---------------------------
THOMAS CLEVELAND wrote:

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spaco wrote:
| No one has mentioned warming the floor. I don't know about you, | but my feet and lower legs are my main problem when standing in a | shop. DO get a heater that has a blower so the floor area can be | warmed, not just the top 4 feet of the shop.
Pete...
One solution to this problem is to install an inexpensive ceiling fan (the "ceiling huggers" are best) and run it at low speed to use the warm air near the ceiling to warm the floor. Not only will it provide greater comfort, but it'll allow you to use less fuel.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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