Heat Dissipation?

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John wrote:

The same is true for RCA cable, toslink, subwoofer cable, speaker cable, etc.
You can definately get cheaper stuff, but I've found that http://www.bluejeanscable.com/ has pretty high grade stuff (Belden/Canare cable, Canare/Neutrik connectors) at reasonable prices for what you get.
Chris
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Chris Friesen wrote:

I've bought HDMI cables and audio cables and video cables at
http://www.cablewholesale.com
All cables were super cheap (half what bluejeanscable charges for HDMI) and very high quality. I would highly recommend them to anyone looking for any kind of cable. The web site works great, and buying is easy as well. No affiliation whatsoever, just a happy customer for at least 3 years now.
--
Jack
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Upscale wrote:

What Leon said. I have racks of multi-thousand dollar audio equipment in a recording studio and we keep the backs of the racks open. Most decent stereo equipment will have heat sinks built in, if needed, and don't need fans.
That said, I'm sure there are differing opinions on this, plus an industry more than ready to sell you something you really don't need, I'm just imparting year of practical experience with high dollar audio equipment in the studio.
Also, there are those among us who can, or could at one time, hear a pop corn fed hummingbird fart at forty paces, and I've never met a fan that not induce some noise into the listening environment, no matter how slight.
IOW, leave the back open and you should not need a fan, and, more than likely even if you enclose it, a simple vent will do the trick.
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You're not well.
r
LMAO
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This is a subject that the manufacturers of mainframe computers have investigated extensively -- and considering that some mainframes have fans near the bottom blowing in (and passive exhaust vents near the top), and others have fans near the top blowing out (and passive intake vents near the bottom), but they *all* have intake at the bottom and outlet at the top, I'd say it doesn't matter much, as long as you have the air flow, *and* it's moving the same direction as convection would naturally take it.
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wrote:

not all. some of my company's computers intake in a vertical vent running the length of the right side front, and exhaust out the back in a vertical vent thnning the length of the left side rear..
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Any experience I have is in the computer and amplifier field, but the sort of rule used to be that if it's a closed area (computer case of semi-sealed cabinet) you use an exhaust fan to pull the heat out, if it's out in the open, you blow air over it..
IMHO, it's best to pull heat away, but either should work... Pulling heat away causes cooled air to be drawn in, so I don't think it makes a lot of difference?
mac
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For sensitive gear I prefer using a push fan coupled with a dust filter. Air flow generates a lot of dust bunnies and the more that you catch (using say, an electrostatic filter) the better. If you use suction then the dust has already passed over your expensive gear.
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On Wed, 17 Jun 2009 09:52:08 GMT, Scatter

Unless you filter the inlet.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Let me throw this in also. PC's have fans, have you ever noticed the dust that collects inside of a computer because it too is being sucked in with the air? Dust inhibits proper ventilation. Adding a fan to the mix may indeed create a problem that you are trying to prevent.
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Leon wrote:

At least, you can take a PC outside and blow the furballs out with an air can. The EC doesn't yield to this as easily.
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I have not had any more problems getting inside my Yamaha receiver, than my computer, to replace the LCD incandescent back knights on 2 separate occasions, but have noticed after 12 years, 2 years ago, there was literally no dust to speak of. Basically my receiver stays very clean inside compared to my PC's.
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Doug Winterburn wrote:

Set the fan up to help natural convection, not to fight it. If it's at the top set it to blow out, if it's at the bottom set it to blow in.
As to which is preferable, if you have the fan set up to blow in you can put a filter on it, which will do a good deal to help the dust problem, but now you have to size the fan to overcome the losses from the filter, and you have to remember to clean or change the filter--most computers with filters never get them cleaned unless there is a corporate weenie whose job it is to go around after hours and clean fan filters.
One other benefit of having the fan blow in is that you can position it to put high velocity airflow on a specific component if you have one that you know is going to be a problem.
Personally I'd make a provision to easily put in fans at both top and bottom (possibly including screw inserts--it's easier to start a machine screw into an insert in an awkward place than to drive a wood screw), but not the fans, and then monitor the temperature (you can get a remote reading digital thermometer at Harbor Freight for 9 bucks that's good enough for this purpose and will show you room temperature besides) and only put in the fans if I saw the temperature in the enclosed area rising above an acceptable level (the components you install should have operating temperatures listed somewhere in the spec sheet--go with the lowest one listed) then add fans until it's down to what you want it to be.
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Dust is a problem, fan or no. I've used computers closed up with fans and wide open without (cpu must be cooled). Dust accumulates, and must occasionally be removed, regarless of configuration.
nb
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writes:

But we are talking about stereo equipment, I was using computer cooling fans as an example. My Yamaha stays pretty dust free, at least in the first 12 years, I have not looked inside in the last 2.
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I constructed an in-wall entertainment center with panel doors on the front and sliding access doors on the back located inside a built-in cabinet. The rear cabinet currently does not have doors.
My equipment (1 5.1 Yamaha receiver, 1 DVD player, 1 digital TV tuner, 1 desktop computer, 1 laser printer, 1 wireless router, and 1 small Windows Home Server box) is all kept cool by a single exhaust fan located at the top of the cabinet with the computers in it. The fan is one I scrounged from an AV setup at an old job that was being scrapped about 6 or 7 years ago. It runs 24/7, and the slight vibrations cause a slight noise, but it works so well I don't care. I could work on making it quieter by putting some different mounting hardware on it to isolate the vibrations more, but enh. It doesn't bother anyone.
Here's the kind of fan I have: http://www.mcmaster.com/#9191k1/=28pqsg
I didn't put in any vents, but rather let the gaps in the doors act as the inlets. Cross-cabinet (the center is 2 sections, divided by 1.5" of plywood) ventilation is provided through the cable run holes I put into the partition. So far none of my equipment has overheated or died other than those that I installed incorrectly (i.e. a digital tuner turned on its side and a cheapo DVD player that got too hot sitting on top of the receiver). I've been through 2 computers in there with no problems, and both cabinets are fine when I open them up to swap out media or adjust volume.
-Nathan
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wrote:

Unless you need to direct airflow over a particular component, at the flow rate and velocity you're dealing with, it won't matter whether the air is "pushed" into or "pulled" out of the box.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Having read all the responses so far, and applying some basic common sense (I hope I have some anyhow), here is what I would do.
I would install the fan at the bottom of the cabinet pushing air into the unit and put a vent(s) or additional fans at the top for air flow and natural hot air flow to escape. Sans the additional fans, the vents should be large at the top but not so large as to allow cats or the stray Canada Goose from entering and causing havok.
With the "pushing" fan at the bottom, the wiring to the fan is theoretically going to be shorter and easier to hide / route / manage too.
I'd also put a mesh or foam filter (oversized so as to not restrict air flow) on the intake and exhaust area to keep dust out as much as possible. Make it removable so you can clean it.
That being said, I've only had one electronic device overheat from dust and that was in a shop environment and NOT pretty.
The steps above are probably overkill for most people's home entertainment systems, but if you really want to set it up to the max, this would at least be a good starting point that doesn't involve liquid nitrogen, etc. <grin>
(Trying to remember to keep the poster's info alive up there in case someone forgot who asked the original question - and needed to know for a very specific reason that I can't imagine at this moment...)
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Joe AutoDrill wrote:

Try to size the vents so that a cat's leg either can't get in, or if it gets in has plenty of clearance to come out. I know of a cat that got its leg broken from poking it down a vent that was a little bit tight and then managing to fall off the back of the enclosure.

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wrote:

Having the fan remove air is more effective than blowing air in.
Mark
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