Hearing protection

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"ken scharf" wrote

Reminds me of working with my grandfather building a garage with recycled nails.
Everytime I missed the steel nail and hit some flesh, he would say, 'Hit the wrong nail?"
I still miss him after all these years. For him, work was an honor. He did it well and made us feel good to participate in his projects with him.
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-MIKE- wrote:

That just tells me that the table was poorly designed.
Chris
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Chris Friesen wrote:

Or the dinner party. (two many guests) :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Lowell Holmes wrote:

Me!
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I wear glasses all the time so I have at least minimal protection. I do have safety glasses to go over them if I'm doing something I feel needs extra protection.
Hearing protection any time I use a router or planer, not so much for the quieter tools.
I also use push sticks and don't take crazy chances or say "its only a quick cut so . . . ."
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Always for the router. Usually for the table saw and the hammer drill (especially into concrete!). Also for the shop vac! (its *LOUD*). I have had a nice pair of David Clark hearing protectors that came with my H10-30 headset. At one time they were good enough to use next to loud airplane engines, but the earpads and foam lining have worn out. (wonder if David Clark has replacement parts).
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ken scharf wrote:

Try aircraftspruce.com or sportys.com. I've seen DC replacement parts all over the place.
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ken scharf wrote:

Yes, they do. There are parts lists on their Web site and some parts can even be ordered online.
--
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--John
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On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 16:14:13 GMT, "Lowell Holmes"

What?
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I'm religious about hearing protection - in fact, I now wear them when mowing the lawn and snowblowing the driveway. Never used to until I started using power tools a lot. It seems I've become more aware of the loudness or something. As for eye protection, I'd like to say I'm religious about it, but I'm not. I wear them pretty much always when ripping on the TS or using a shaper. Not so much with the jointer, rarely with the bandsaw or miter saw. Not smart I'm sure - so I'm trying to get better about it. I just have a tough time keeping them clean and since I've never worn glasses I'm not in the habit of putting them on and leaving them on.

I've started using push sticks a LOT more. In most cases I feel I have better control, so it's a double bonus. The key is to have them handy at each machine and to have the appropriate ones for each cut. If they aren't handy, I tend not to go looking.

I had one of my gnarliest cuts with a handsaw. It jumped over onto my thumb and left a ragged tear that took a few stitches and left a lot of scar tissue.

I'm sure with a hatchet or an adze, as someone else said.
JP
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Safety glasses, never. Face shield, always.
I have multiple reasons for preferring a face shield over safety glasses: 1) Safety *glasses* won't fit over the prescription eyeglasses I have to wear all the time anyway. Safety *goggles* do, but they often fog up. Face shields don't have that problem. 2) A face shield is much easier to put on and take off. 3) For me, at least, a face shield is more comfortable. 4) There are other things on your face besides your eyes that need protection from impacts.
Hearing protection, always with power tools or hammers.
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I use hearing protection anytime I'm using power tools. I use a face sheild when I'm turning on the lathe, but otherwise not so much.
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Lowell Holmes wrote:

Since I have had a hearing loss all my life, I am a fanatic about hearing protection. I also wear face masks often.
My wife got a rock thrown into her eye and did some damage while weed whacking. It healed up OK. But she won't hardly pick up a tool or anything that is powered without first putting on safety glasses.
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leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net says...

I got a wake-up call when, back in my 30ies, I went to see a local band play at the hall and I subsequently lost all hearing in one ear for several days in conjunction with a good dose of tinnitus. If there's a power tool going, I'll be wearing my earmuffs, and they aren't cheap ones either. The good ones work out cheaper in the medium to long run anyhow, cause they neither break nor lose efficiency quickly due to bad materials.

Since I've had some juice go through a (net) faceshield into my eye a couple of times and an aluminium filing once without a power tool near, not to mention other debris when working under old houses I've become very careful. Putting on those safety glasses can save a lot of pain, or worse, I reckon.
As well, I wear tough drill cotton overalls even in hot conditions when working with power tools. LOL - I once set my well worn overalls on fire with an angle grinder, but being cotton I got out of them faster than the flames could give me more than a light sunburn-type singeing. Gods know what would've happened with synthetics.
-P.
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On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 16:14:13 GMT, "Lowell Holmes"

Since I bought myself a pocket size MP3 player and 'in the ear canal' isolating earphones I never use a power tool, indoors or outdoors, without the protection and sensory enjoyment afforded by the 'phones.
Now Playing: Bill Sheffield - Live at the Blue Raccoon
tb
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Got a set of "Work Tunes" hearing protection ear muffs and a FM transmitter like you use in a car. I can now listen to AM and FM radio, CD's or my mp3 player. Works well the hearing protection is equal to most of the other hearing protectors I have used and the sound quality on the Work Tunes is fair to good, it encourages me to keep them on most of the time. The range on the FM transmitter is about 30 feet so it is not to bad.
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On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 16:14:13 GMT, "Lowell Holmes"

Prescription safety glasses with side shields go on as soon as I am in the shop.
I also insert foam ear plugs, or I use an MP3 play with ear buds that do a modest job of sealing outside sound. If I use a router or other loud item or feel the need to turn up the volume, I put on my Peltor earmuffs. They are comfortable enough.
Where I fall down is using the dust mask often enough.
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Jim Weisgram wrote:

I bought a couple of simple dust masks and try to remember to use them when cutting 'synthetic' wood products such as plywood, fiber board, etc. Also when cutting 'PT', or any stuff that contains nasty chemicals. Though just plane old sawdust can be bad enough. You know when you should have worn a dust mask after your 'snot' is full of sawdust.
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ken scharf wrote:

>

Failing to wear a dusk mask is almost certain to leave me susceptible to a sinus infection of some kind. If I've fallen down and forgotten to use one (and as you say, you blow your nose and your snot is full of dust) I go straight into the bathroom and use one of these:
http://www.neilmed.com/usa/sinusrinse.php
Freaky as hell the first time you use one, but I tell you what - it *works*. Cleans all that crap right out, and I've never once gotten another dust induced nasal infection since I've started using them.
--
See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
To reply, eat the taco.
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Steve Turner wrote:

We used to snort warm salt water and get it all running though the nasal cavity and coming down through the mouth. Learned it from an old dude. Gross, but worked like a charm. I do it every now and then when I get stuffed up and I'm surprised at how well it works.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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