Hearing protection

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Along with the posts about planers,
How many of us use safety glasses and hearing protection religiously?
Occasionally I will skip it, but mostly I use them.
Push sticks, I use all the time. I follow David Mark's 3" rule.
My handsaws don't require any of them. :-)
I wonder if self amputation of an appendage ever took place using hand tools?
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I use hearing protection religiously. I had a misspent youth in close proximity to loud guitar amplifiers, and now have a screaming case (literally) of tinnitus. I once used my shop vac without hearing protection, and it resulted in a permanent escalation in the loudness of the ringing in my ears. Never again!
Kevin
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I never operate any loud machinery again without hearing protection. That includes, all shop tools, snowblowers, lawnmowers and so on.
I have a decibel meter which allows me to test the levels of these tools and anything over my target range is noted for hearing protection. I was born with hearing loss, though not extremely significant, but enough to ask "what?" many times which can be annoying to people and also have mild case of tinnitus. As another said, I want to save what I have left.
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Something to think about and not to dispute why your ears ring but my wife occasionally has this problem, I have had this problem as far back as I can remember. My wife can cure her problem though, on the off chance you use an artificial sweetener, try not using it for a few weeks. She had heard that these sweeteners will cause ringing in your ears and when she gets off the artificial sweetener the ringing goes away.
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temporary to permanent. What is known are some things, such as the sweetener, high triglyceride level and a few other lifestyle habits which can be controlled. Other reasons are permanent such as excessive loud music and/or sounds for long durations, especially earlier in life as we grow, an instant loud noise or bang such as a gunshot, fireworks, ect. which can cause a shock to the eardrum and haircells. Other reasons are uncertain as they can partake in any person at any given time but usually partakes to people with hearing loss, such as myself but can even partake in a perfect hearing individual.
Basically, tinnitus is a mystery for the most part and the cause within the ear is unknown though it can be related to the diminishing haircells which we need to hear. The sad part is there is no known treatment for it and over 3 million people are effected by it.
Another sad part which many people fail to realize is they have the option to save their hearing but neglect in doing so. Listening to loud music or not using ear protection for those high decibel sounds "will", not might, but "will" have a disheartening effect later in life. People don't get used to a high decibel noise, they simply lose their hearing. But the real kicker is those who think hearing loss is the only problem they may encounter, they forget about the tinnitus. In some people, it can be overbearing and very difficult to live with. Then they have regrets for not taken more precautions as a young adult.
Basically put, please protect your hearing and your eyes. They aren't easy to live without as would be a limb.
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On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 13:54:09 -0600, "Leon"

I misread that the first time. I thought you said my wife occasionally causes this problem....I know mine does.
Mike O.
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I also have tinnitus, - for the same reason. Playing in bands in the 60's & 70's. Mostly Rock. Louder the better. We could feel the air displacement standing in front of the speakers. I ended up with an 8 channel solid state 300W Roland deck driving two Huge SP1 Peavey boxes with horns and a box with eight 10 inch Celestions. My guitar was then overdriven through a WEM Copicat with the gain cranked up high to give distortion through the valves.
It was just full on noise. We were terrible! The audience didn't seem to care. We couldn't hear normal conversation for a while after a show. I must admit, I had the best time! Memories that can still bring a smile. Would do it all again. : )
These days, it's hearing protection always whenever I'm working. The industry I'm in, (mining and construction,) has regular mandatory hearing tests, which I *just* manage to pass. Fortunately, the tinnitus and hearing loss has not got any worse in recent years.
Diggerop
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Fanatically. no power switch gets thrown without both.
In my invincible (hah!) youth, stupidity along these lines led to a serious eye trauma. no permanent damage, but I certainly don't want to go through the wondering if there was going to be again. As for hearing protection, I'd like to keep what I have left.
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Sure have... if you include toes, axes and adzes. ;~) I also recall a Boy Scout at camp sinking a hatchet in his thigh while limbing a tree with a less than well sharpened tool. Regarding handsaws, carpenters of old were sometimes afflicted with "carpenter's thumb" because the saw jumped the kerf and cut the tendon in their thumb.... not sure about full amputations though. Overall, I think stab wounds are probably most common and those among the less well trained--screwdrivers used for things other than driving screws and placing ones hands in the path of chisels.
John
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Hearing protection, rarely. Eye protection, always (my eyeglasses are safety glasses!) For some stuff, if possible, I'll use a whole face shield (angle grinders are particularly nasty IMO and for any roughing work at the lathe.) Push sticks, whenever it is warranted.
Back in high school metal shop, a kid cut nearly half way through his thumb (including the bone) with a hack saw. It's a wonder I can remember any of it but that is one thing I will *never* forget. Since then, I know exactly where a saw is headed and where my hands are.
Ed
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Lowell Holmes wrote:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21973683 /
He's either very tough or very something else. Either way I wouldn't wanna mess with him.
--
--
--John
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When I'm working in the Morton building, I almost always use my hearing protection. (I was wondering why that saw was so loud. Time to put on the hearing protection.)
When working outside, I'm not as fanatic about it. The sound has places to go instead of reflecting back. I still do wear hearing protection most the time though.
Eye protection is another story. With glasses and sweating in the face, it makes supplemental eye protection difficult to keep clear. I'd rather take my chances with sawdust than not being able to see. I still use it, but usually take it off between cuts.
Puckdropper
--
On Usenet, no one can hear you laugh. That's a good thing, though, as
some writers are incorrigible.
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On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 16:14:13 GMT, "Lowell Holmes"

I've gotten pretty obsessive about hearing protection since I lost all hearing in my left ear - I really don't want to diminish the right ear at all if I can avoid it. I just keep a half-dozen pairs of cheap ear-muffs around (get them at HF on sale) and stick them on whenever I get ready to start up a power tool.
Eye protection - not so much. My prescription glasses are pretty much as tough as safety glasses, although without the side protection, so I tend to only use the safety goggles if I'm doing something that would involve a lot of chips or stuff flying around. I also like eye protection when doing demo overhead, since old house dust really, really hurts when it gets in your eyes.
I am totally paranoid about spinning blades, so I use them all the time on the TS and jointer. The band saw doesn't worry me as much because it isn't prone to throwing or grabbing things, so I work much closer to it without mechanical assistance.
YMMV
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Tim Douglass wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net says...

Do tell? I had lots of blades snap on my old 3 wheeler and one on my new-ish 19" two wheeler so far, but it's always been a moderately suppressed 'boofffffffffffff' noise and the blade coming to an immediate full stop with the motor keeping on running. Never seen anything flinging or flung at all when that happens. ?!?
I'm curious -P.
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Peter Huebner wrote:

Apart from being rather loud and startling (sometimes to the point where a change of underwear is necessary) I've never had the blade wrap around my neck or had my finger nicked or anything like that.
--
Repeat after me:
"I am we Todd it. I am sofa king we Todd it."
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snipped-for-privacy@swtacobell.net says...

I had one snake out of the machine and spring off the table.
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On Mon, 19 Jan 2009 18:57:02 -0500, ken scharf

Compared to what a table saw is capable on any cut the risk from a broken band saw blade is pretty small. The blade is in the machine housing all but the throat, there is an upper guide that comes down to within about a 1/2" of the work and the rest of the blade is in the work. If it breaks it loses velocity *very* rapidly and really only presents an issue directly to the sides of the blade path.
I have to admit that I've hurt myself far worse with a handsaw than with any power tool. The worst "power tool" injury I've gotten is just about concussing myself standing up and cracking my head on the table saw extension. Now that smarts!
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Tim Douglass wrote:

That ranks right up there with hitting the center of your kneecap on the support of a dining room table as you slide your chair in.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

(or some other part of your hand).
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