Have You Ever Measured Your 48" T-Square?

I have 2 Drywall T Squares, made by 2 different companies. Neither of them is actually 48". One is 1/8" short, the other is shy by 3/16".
The problem isn't the side with the markings that start at "0" by the T and end at 47 7/8", it's the side with the markings that start at "0" at the end away from the T and end at 48" at the T. That first 1" marking, (which is directly opposite the 47" marking) isn't at 1" from the end, so none of markings on that side are accurate.
Now, I know that a Drywall T Square is not meant to be a precision measurement device and I know how to "shift an inch" to compensate for the incorrect marking, but I wonder why they bother to mark the inaccurate side in the first place. If you want markings on both sides, just start both sides at "0" by the T so that the markings line up and are accurate.
Seems like they could just make the T squares a true 48" and eliminate the problem. Maybe they do...both of mine were bought at the borg but they were bought 20 years apart, so it's not a new issue.
Not a big problem, just an observation.
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I think you just have bad luck. I have a Johnson T square for drywall. I just measured it and it measures 48". Seems to have the right markings written on it also.
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On Thursday, October 13, 2016 at 7:36:45 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wro te:

I just measured it and it measures 48". Seems to have the right markings w ritten on it also.
I don't know if it's luck or the brand(s). I posted the same thing in anoth er group and had others tell me that their squares were also shorter than 48“.
No biggy. In fact, I just cut one of mine down to 42“ so it's reall y short now.
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On Thu, 13 Oct 2016 20:50:02 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

My Johnson is 48" long, if you believe my tape measure. ;-)
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On Saturday, October 15, 2016 at 8:16:03 PM UTC-4, krw wrote:

wrote:

. I just measured it and it measures 48". Seems to have the right marking s written on it also.

other group and had others

ally short now.

They say size doesn't matter, but 48" probably would.
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On 10/15/16 9:47 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I just measured it and it measures 48". Seems to have the right markings written on it also.

Then the question begs, is it square?
-BR
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On Sunday, October 16, 2016 at 9:47:34 AM UTC-5, Brewster wrote:

Does it really make much/any difference? These are used for drywall cuttin g. All the drywall I have ever done had 1/8", 1/4" gaps between sheets. E very edge is covered with tape and filled with mud. Precision is not neces sary with drywall work. And even if you use the square for cutting plywood for exterior sheathing, precision is not that crucial. You're putting sub floor on. 1/8" gaps over a joist are not important. And you can always po und it in. Or smash the edges until it fits. The T-square is not used on James Krenov furniture.
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On Sunday, October 16, 2016 at 2:47:01 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote :

ing. All the drywall I have ever done had 1/8", 1/4" gaps between sheets. Every edge is covered with tape and filled with mud. Precision is not nec essary with drywall work. And even if you use the square for cutting plywo od for exterior sheathing, precision is not that crucial. You're putting s ubfloor on. 1/8" gaps over a joist are not important. And you can always pound it in. Or smash the edges until it fits. The T-square is not used o n James Krenov furniture.
umm...you may not have noticed that we're no longer talking about a drywall square.
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On Sunday, October 16, 2016 at 2:14:27 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:
te:

tting. All the drywall I have ever done had 1/8", 1/4" gaps between sheets . Every edge is covered with tape and filled with mud. Precision is not n ecessary with drywall work. And even if you use the square for cutting ply wood for exterior sheathing, precision is not that crucial. You're putting subfloor on. 1/8" gaps over a joist are not important. And you can alway s pound it in. Or smash the edges until it fits. The T-square is not used on James Krenov furniture.

ll

Its a 48 inch T square. You use it to cut drywall. Maybe cut some plywood for sheathing. Plywood and drywall come in 4' x 8' sheets. 48" is 4 feet . Cut from one side to the other. Or draw a line from one side to the oth er. What do you think 48 inch T squares are used for? Cutting veneered pl ywood for cabinets? Cutting boards to length?
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On Sunday, October 16, 2016 at 9:42:15 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote :

rote:

cutting. All the drywall I have ever done had 1/8", 1/4" gaps between shee ts. Every edge is covered with tape and filled with mud. Precision is not necessary with drywall work. And even if you use the square for cutting p lywood for exterior sheathing, precision is not that crucial. You're putti ng subfloor on. 1/8" gaps over a joist are not important. And you can alw ays pound it in. Or smash the edges until it fits. The T-square is not us ed on James Krenov furniture.

wall

od for sheathing. Plywood and drywall come in 4' x 8' sheets. 48" is 4 fe et. Cut from one side to the other. Or draw a line from one side to the o ther. What do you think 48 inch T squares are used for? Cutting veneered plywood for cabinets? Cutting boards to length?
OK. I reread the latest posts. Not talking about the square.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

the edges until it fits. The T-square is not used on James Krenov furniture.

Perhaps you are not a native speaker of American--the discussion has gone from a square to a Johnson, which is used for a rather different kind of woodworking.

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On Monday, October 17, 2016 at 2:14:21 AM UTC-5, J. Clarke wrote:

wrote:

l cutting. All the drywall I have ever done had 1/8", 1/4" gaps between sh eets. Every edge is covered with tape and filled with mud. Precision is n ot necessary with drywall work. And even if you use the square for cutting plywood for exterior sheathing, precision is not that crucial. You're put ting subfloor on. 1/8" gaps over a joist are not important. And you can a lways pound it in. Or smash

ure.

rywall

I missed the "Johnson" part until now. That's good. The "woodworking" is a little coarser than I care to tread.
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On Monday, October 17, 2016 at 4:41:01 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote :

om wrote:

all cutting. All the drywall I have ever done had 1/8", 1/4" gaps between sheets. Every edge is covered with tape and filled with mud. Precision is not necessary with drywall work. And even if you use the square for cutti ng plywood for exterior sheathing, precision is not that crucial. You're p utting subfloor on. 1/8" gaps over a joist are not important. And you can always pound it in. Or smash

iture.

drywall


s a little coarser than I care to tread.
"woodworking" is too coarse but the 48" square Johnson comment was OK? Inte resting. ;-)
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On Sunday, October 16, 2016 at 10:47:34 AM UTC-4, Brewster wrote:

om wrote:

ll.

another group and had others

really short now.

For all those on the receiving end of such a tool, may I be the first to say "Ouch!"
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On 10/15/2016 10:47 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

So much for closeness ...
--
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