Have you built Popular Woodworking's miter saw stand


Has anyone built this miter saw stand?
http://www.popularwoodworking.com/features/fea.asp?id 21
If so, can you tell me if you are happy with it? I am thinking strongly about doing it (minus the vacuum system which will be useless with my saw).
TIA.
Dick Snyder
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yes, and no. i'm not thrilled. rather than build this, my suggestion would be to build a cabinet run along a wall with areas to plop in various tools (morticer, chop saw, mini drill press (if appropriate)) and have each tool at the right height to take advantage of the long run of cabinets and long fence
i removed my saw from that cabinet a while back and i've been looking to put it to use since. specific complaints:
1) it's challenging to level the tables. harder than it looks. 2) it's difficult to remove the saw if you ever need to take it to a jobsite 3) instead of having T-track along the wings, i have found that i much prefer a LONG fence (along a long run of cabinets) with a sliding flipstop system on the fence, rather than on the table. i feel that's more accurate and easier to use.
but that's just me.
good luck with whatever you do.
---- dz
Dick Snyder wrote:

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Hmmmm. Norm's miter saw stand has a kind of flip stop system. I don't like his design because it isn't on wheels but on saw horses. I think I will look hard at his design with the idea of modifying it to be more mobile than saw horses allow. He has a more recent version which is a very long table but that won't work well in my shop (i.e., basement)- - my wife has this strange idea that the basement has more purposes than for just my woodworking ---- what a strange idea :-) (e.g.. storing unused things that our kids haven't the room for yet)

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I was thinking about maybe combining features of the various tables. The long fence would certainly be useful, I am not so keen on the idea of having the adjustable height table though, looks to me like all the weight of the saw is on four bolts suspended in mid air that are going to vibrate.
I would design the system to allow for some tweakage in the attachment of the tables, then once everything was lined up right set them permenently with screws. I cannot see much point in being able to swap out the mitre saw for a mortiser. I suspect that the unit was originally designed for a planer which would explain the flat tables and adjustment mechanism.
I have seen quite a few people mention that casters, even lockable ones are not a good idea for a unit like this, they can be unstable. Has anyone looked at the scheme Norm used on his assembly table where the casters are mounted on a flip down plate secured by flaps? That looks like a much more stable scheme to me. Unfortch, I have only seen the photos on the Web site, not the program.
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Hi David,
I just finished looking at the tape I copied from HGTV of Norm making his chop saw station. He had a kind of flip stop that slid along with wings. He has a tape attached to the wings so he can get an accurate measurement for distance. You made a comment about the T-track that I don't totally follow because the plan for the Popular Woodworking miter saw stand is somewhat opaque and hard to understand. Can you say more about the difficulty of their system vs a flip stop system?
TIA.
Dick Snyder

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Dick Snyder wrote:

I have built this also, and am fairly happy with it. Yes, it would be nicer to have a long cabinet with a long fence, but this works better for me because I need everything to be mobile. With this I can roll it into a storage area at the end of the shop when I don't need it. If space is no concern, I would build what the other poster mentioned. FWIW, I might have just gotten lucky, but my tables weren't too hard to get level. (At least level enough for me)
-Rob
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On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 22:26:10 -0500, "Dick Snyder"

You're going to be happy with it. Get yourself a nice blade for the miter saw if you don't have one already- I use mine as much or more than my tablesaw for crosscutting. Without some sort of table, it's a whole different tool, and only useful for the roughest work.
Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
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Dick Snyder wrote:

I have built it, and i tried it with the vacum, but the vacum didn't work well enough and have taken that out.
I've been very happy with it and found leveling the table to be just a matter of taking a little time. I actually changed saws and was able to continue to use the system just by re-levling the table.
It would be nice to have a fence, but the t-track works fine, I would make a much larger stop though, since the small stop may not be big enough depending upon where the table of the saw winds up.
It rolls into the corner, and can take it out when i need and cross cut whatever i need to.
build it and you will use it.
Stuart
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I build a similar one (Shop Notes dual tool station) recently. I used heavy duty 3" castors from Highland Hardware with the sides of the cabinet entending down 2 1/2" down from the bottom and installed heavy duty cabinet levelers from Rockler on the outside bottom of the sides. This way I can move the saw easily and still level it rock solid off the castors. Works well but after all the effort to adjust everything just right I will opt for a long bench built in next time.
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