Have project, need router?

I have an outline design for a countertop style desk and some shelving for a childs bedroom.
I'm planning to use 0.75/1.0 inch plywood trimmed with Formica/laminate for durability.
However, the design includes some large radius curves (r$ inches and r inches).
I currently have virtually no power tools. But I'm thinking I could cut those curves smoothly enough to accept the laminate edge banding with a router and circle cutting jig like this:
http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/tl_power_tools/article/0,,DIY_14392_2270388,00 . html
I'm hoping the router can also serve as my laminate trimmer, with the appropriate bits, of course.
Does this sound feasible? Any recommendations on the router?
Other comments and suggestions most welcome.
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| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
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All with in practical limits of this router: http://patwarner.com/dw621.html
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On Oct 19, 2:21 pm, snipped-for-privacy@malch.com (Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@patwarner.com wrote:

Or this one: $20.00
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberD914
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wrote:

I'd spring for the DW621, or a PC690, or a Bosch 1617, or a million other routers, before I'd cut circles with a Harbor Freight laminate trimmer. If you never use the router again, you'd probably take a $20-30 hit selling it used on eBay. Cutting a curve in a single bite, out of a 3/4" to 1" thick surface substrate, is far better suited to a real router, with a 1/2" shank bit.
Did 'ya actually look at the OP's link? <G>
--------------------------------------------- ** http://www.bburke.com/woodworking.html ** ---------------------------------------------
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2007 21:21:11 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@malch.com (Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

Jigsaw for cutting the plywood. sandpaper for smoothing the cut, trim router for trimming laminate.
John
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wrote:

Yes, I subsequently had exactly the same thought. It looks like I can do this job with:
* One fairly heavy duty router
OR
* A jig saw and a light-duty/trim router
The second option is likely to be easier for me to handle as a "router virgin". I'm still pondering which tools are likely to prove more useful to me over the coming years.
I prefer to own and care for good quality tools although an el cheapo Harbor Freight jig saw and trim router is certainly an option for this job. That's really not the way I want to go but it's just too economically attractive to dismiss without some careful thought.
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Malcolm,
A 'Trim Router' is not exactly a 'heavy duty' tool. 'Finesse work' is much more to the point. However, I do agree - I would be quite leery about getting a 1/2inch FULL size, 3hp, unit for all of $89 !!!! I can't really comment about the jig saw - although my 'old' Sears is rather light weight {plastic, you know}. . . and my VERY OLD Sears is heavy, metal, and installed in a portable table . . . an 'open top' band-saw, if you will.
While I started out with a Sears '1/4 inch' Router many years ago {since sold}, I now have a 1/2inch in a table I build, a 1/2 inch 'D' handle, another Sears 1/4inch {'gifted' to me}and two 1/4inch 'Trim Routers' . . . one of them the HF. I got the HF as a 'back-up' to the Ryobi, and my neighbor - a construction supervisor - was so impressed he had to get one!! While the Ryobi is a little 'used' and attached to a special base, the HF is ready for any small, close, work.
For YOUR project, the 'Trim' unit & 'Circle-cutting jig' will work quite well. Try it this way - to ease the strain for a more accurate cut . . . 1} Set up the Jig & Trim Router. 2} Using a straight bit, cut a SHALLOW {1/4in or less}, circular, groove 3} Drill an appropriately sized hole in the groove, or just outside of it. 4} Insert the jigsaw blade, and cut out the circle - leaving about a 1/16 'remainder' 5} With the 'Straight' bit, or an 'Edge Trimming' bit, use the Jig & Router to 'clean up' the edge.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop
SNIP

Harbor Freight jig saw and trim router is certainly an option for this job. That's really not the way I want to go but it's just too economically attractive to dismiss without some careful thought.
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A good 1/2" router can certainly do laminate trimming.
A decent router with a home made circle cutting jig can make curves all day long.
I would look in pawn shops for a decent 690 Porter Cable.
Almost every single add-on device for a router is designed around the Porter Cable 690 family.
Malcolm Hoar wrote:

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