Hardwood Flooring

Page 1 of 3  
Any advantage of one or the other when considering pre-finished VS unfinished wood flooring other than the obvious work involved in finishing the raw stuff?
I'm thinking total cost and durability, etc.
I'm told pre-finished lasts longer but is tougher to install... But I'm doing the install so...
Pergo and other "fake stuff" is NOT for me so don't bother telling about it.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com Production Tapping: http://Production-Tapping-Equipment.com / Flagship Site: http://www.Drill-N-Tap.com VIDEOS:
http://www.youtube.com/user/AutoDrill

V8013-R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/26/2010 1:11 PM, Joe AutoDrill wrote:

like it came out of the package yesterday even with a bunch of crumb cruncher grand kids tearing thru all the time. I , IMHO, didn't find it any more difficult to install than unfinished other than taking a lot of time out to change saw blades. The finish will definitely chew thru blades and it does require sharp ones to come out looking nice. Just out of curiousity I hit a scrap piece with 60 grit, hand rubbed, and dust flew every where but after I rubbed the dust off I could barely see any difference in the finish. Shouldn't have to worry about trying to refinish it ever but if it gets that bad would probably be easier to just remove and replace the floor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe AutoDrill wrote:

I've never seen a piece of pre-finished flooring that didn't have a slight bevel on all the edges of the face side of each board. The pre-finished still looks good to me, but if you want a perfectly flat/even floor (no crumb/dirt catchers) then I'd say unfinished would be the way to go.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Agreed, However my experience is that prefinished tends to be a bit more stable. Perfectly flat is temporary as the wood moves.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They can't make prefinished without that bevel. You would have two 90 deg edges meeting and anywhere they weren't perfectly flush height-wise (and that would be everywhere) you would have splinters coming off.
jc
p.s. post-installation finished floors are only perfectly flat until the first season changes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As they say over at St. Michaels in Newark... BINGO!
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/26/10 3:17 PM, Joe AutoDrill wrote:

That's why you sand and re-finish every 6mos, silly.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Some of the ones have huge bevels on the sides (so you could install it over grass in the yard?) and it takes a while to find one with a minimal bevel. We finally found some maple with only a small bevel and that's what's in the living room.
In other rooms, we put in engineered hardwood. It looks good, and doesn't have those annoying bevels.
Just about the only unfinished I've seen around here (except maybe through specialty stores) has been the red oak at Menards. The prefinished is much more available. (Sometimes you can get enough of the color you want on sale, too.)
My sister has cork in her house, and it doesn't feel any different than regular materials and looks to be holding up ok. It still does groove and dent if you, say, roll a chair over the same spot.
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I installed "engineered" Maple flooring in my bathroom about 6~7 years ago. Holding up very well. "Engineered" wood flooring is all wood but made like plywood. The finish has a 25 year warranty IIRC, the top layer is supposed to be thick enough to sand down and refinish if that ever needed to be done. My floor floats and was no harder to install than something like Pergo.

A flooring company that sells solid hard wood flooring, engineered hard wood flooring, carpet, tile, and laminate/Pergo style flooring told me that only real wood floors and ceramic style tile are considered permanent upgrades. Everything else will have to be replaced, eventually.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/26/10 1:35 PM, Leon wrote:

Interesting. I guess that would certainly depends on the product *and* installation. Many of us have seen bad solid hardwood floor product/installation that took less work to replace than repair/refinish.
Some of the engineered stuff I've seen, had close to 3/16 hardwood top veneer, with the stain penetrating the entire ply. You could sand and refinish that stuff without re-staining.
My wife is in love with Cork for the kitchen. I'm looking into it. I like the 1'x3' and longer sizes I'm seeing, too. Seems like installation with one man could be done in a day.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A kitchen in a day alone? It'd be a heck of a day, what with toe kick removal, installing under cabinet fronts, under fridge, under dishwasher, along edges of cabinets, toe kick re-install, the multitude of doorways and thresholds in most kitchens, pantry, etc etc...
Been there many times, done that, and now I charge quite a premium for it... :-)
jc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/26/10 2:54 PM, Joe wrote:

I was speaking of the install, alone, and probably the trim. Since I would be doing it, myself, I'm thinking in segments that I would likely break it into. And it's a small kitchen. - Day of prep, tear out vinyl floor, old trim.... all of it, casement, base, everything, because I'm replacing and/or making it all. - Day of installing Cork floor, and probably trim, or partial trim. - Day of finishing up and determining that rest of house looks ugly by comparison... lamenting that we should've never even considered it because now we're going to have to do the living-room in hardwood, with new trim everywhere... and I hate those windows..... oh crap. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Your day 3 is 100% accurate :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Basically what I am saying here is that the permanent upgrades should not have to be replaced. Laminated floors and carpet will eventually show wear and need to be replaced. You cannot rejuvenate carpet or Pergo.

Engeneered wood floring is considered permanent. Don't confuse it with laminate flooring.

Cork is cool, it was real popular in the late 50's and early 60's, but it does wear out and tends to eventually show wear tracks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/26/10 4:41 PM, Leon wrote:

Alright, we're on the same page.

Have you walked on the stuff? It's nice. I'd like to line the shop with it.
Heck, if it wears out, you could put Pergo right over it. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes I have! Very quiet and soft so to speak. A lot like linoleum.

Yeah . ;~)
There is nothing wrong with any of the products as long as you realize their life expectancy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've been lurking on this thread, as it's pertinent to our situation. Insurance claim for water damage, about 500 sq ft of hardwood to be replaced in living room and dining room (continuous floor, so it all comes out).
Thanks to everyone who's contributed. It's been a great help.
What's coming out is thin strip oak. We've spent about 10 days with samples spread all over the place.
We finally settled on Jatoba ("Brazilian Cherry"), real wood, with a matte finish.
Now we just have to choose baseboards, paint, and tile to go in front of the garden door.
Who knew that 5 gallons of water from an aquarium could change our entire decor!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Dave,
Be aware if you're putting the brazilian cherry in yourself. It is *very* prone to splitting when you drive the fasteners (nails or staples). Many times, I've had the entire tongue split off when I've driven the first fastener.
Not trying to talk you out of it, it's beautiful stuff, just want you to be aware.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for the heads up, Joe.
As this is an insurance job, I'm working with the general contractor my insurance company recommended, and with the flooring installer he uses. All three of them are well known here with good reputations.
So I'll let the pros do it, and I will look for any sign of splits before I sign off.
I'm not surprised, actually. The stuff is high on the hardness chart.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dave Balderstone" wrote

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.