Harbor Freight Tormek Clone

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This one: http://www.oneway.ca/sharpening/grind_jig.htm with the skew: http://www.oneway.ca/sharpening/skew.htm It was all in a prepack from Woodcraft.
You just screw it down to the bench that the grinder is on. In the case of that particular HF grinder with the slow-down worm gear, you would mount the grinder sideways so the wet wheel is perpendicular to the front of the bench.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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wrote:

Thank You. The pictures shows it being used on long lathe chisels. My question is since the wheel on this model sits higher than normal grinders do you have to elevate the jig in order to clear the water trough? Can you use this jig to sharpen short bench chisels? My grinder is packed away. I could be mistaken but I thought the direction of rotation was wrong for using the end of the grinder that is easily accessible?
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Actually, I elevated the grinder to fit the Wolverine jig under the center of the wheel. The wheel spins downward on the accessible end.
To be honest, I haven't used it with the water trough. It's a slow turning wheel (only 160rpm, 180 on newer ones) and I have had any heat issues. I usually hone my gouges after sharpening, with a wet (for slurry) piece of 320-400 rolled into a curve.
As for the water trough, I think you could mount the grinder even higher to clear trough and still be fine. Since we're talking about a round wheel, you would just slide the jig in or out the get the same angle, to make up for higher or lower, right?
For what it worth, I also freehand flat chisels and such on the flat side of the wheel.
I haven't gotten real anal about sharpening, yet, and I'm not an expert on the theory by any means. But I got pretty sharp for a long time freehanding everything on a fast grinder and Arkansas Stones. When I went to the Wolverine jig and the HF slow wheel, it was like using brand new turning tools every time.
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-MIKE-

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BTW, here's the reason I bought the thing in the first place:
http://www.mikedrums.com/sandertable.mov
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-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

I once heard a story from a guy who learned the hard way not to operate power tools while standing on a concrete floor with bare feet, apparently it was a shocking experience.
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DGDevin wrote:

I figured I'd catch flack for splinters or dropping stuff on my feet. :-)
But electrical shock? Really? How old was the wiring in that guy's house and did it have a ground?
If he's getting shocked while operating power tools.... he needs some new tools, not shoes.
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For short bench chisels, you use the Tormek with the bar in the horizonal position, so the direction is away from the edge. The water trough is not in the way.
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So, if you need to make a few passes on your hard Arkansas stone anyway, why not get a good grinder with a fairly fine wheel to put a pretty good edge on your tools, then make the final passes on the Arkansas stone? You already stated that you need to be careful with the setup, so why not just be careful when grinding? The dry grinder will be so much more versatile because you can put on different stones, and won't cost any more than the Tormek clone.
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Scritch wrote:

Because there's little danger of overheating the steel with a wet grinder?
Greg M
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For all the reported "issues" with HFT, I find them well worth having available.
I bought a 15GA finish nailer with a 15% off coupon several weeks ago only to find LOWES offering the Hitachi for 30 bucks less last week (prettier, lighter, and better features I thought). I had also purchased an air file on closeout for about ten bucks that leaked air and needed to be returned. So I bought the Hitachi (by that time they were down to $44! and took the HFT nailer and Air file and a 10" carbide saw blade and a clamp to the HFT in Charlotte yesterday.
No problems what so ever. Full credit for the nail gun on my Visa, swapped me out a new air file (this one with a box and a set of three files), swapped out the slippery clamp for a much nicer version they now carry and the saw blade as well. The new air file works fine and the three free files doesn't hurt a bit. And, I effectively got a $12 bonus credit as well. I also got a $5 off coupon at the bottom of my receipt!
If they stand by their stuff like this, why not try and buy and return if not satisfied?
Next time I have $15 off coupon, I may check this wet/dry grinder out. Liked the posts and all the links folks added - most hepfull, you betcha
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