Happy days

Page 1 of 2  
Finally convinced my wife that I deserve the double garage for my shop and will soon be moving out of the single stall I now call home. This means a f ixed location for most of my machinery, especially the TS (soon to be equip ped with a fixed outfeed table). Need to do the prep work first -- power di stribution and lighting and a good plan for dust collection. Want to minim ize wires on the floor and all the other crap that gets in the way of my fe et.
Larry (48 days to retirement, but who's counting?)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gramp's shop wrote:

will soon be moving out of the single stall I now call home. This means a fixed location for most of my machinery, especially the TS (soon to be equipped with a fixed outfeed table). Need to do the prep work first -- power distribution and lighting and a good plan for dust collection. Want to minimize wires on the floor and all the other crap that gets in the way of my feet.

Retirement is great when you have something you like to do to keep you occupied. People ask me how it is to be retired. I tell them if I had know how great it is I would have retired when I was 20.
Have fun in the shop. Half the fun is getting it set up like you want.
--
 GW Ross 

 When I was a kid, I was an imaginary 
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gramp's shop wrote:

Suggestion: Put the power outlets on the ceiling.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've got an extension cord that hangs down over my bench. It is extremely convenient and gets used often. I mounted it at about wrist height, with my hand fully extended, so it's easy to grab but tall enough to stay out of the way if I ever move the bench.
I've been thinking about dropping a post in the middle of the table saw/jointer/planer area to eliminate the power cord there. It'll also give me a place to run a dust collection pipe.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Puckdropper wrote:

I first saw the idea - power from ceiling outlets - in a large room full of offset printing presses. The power cord for each press went straight up to an outlet in the ceiling (with a clamp so the plug wouldn't fall out). Twenty or so printing presses all humming along without the necessity of bumps in the floor for conduit or digging up the concrete.
Worked swell.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/16/2013 11:55 AM, HeyBub wrote:

But then, they weren't moving 4'x8' sheets of ply, 6' lengths of 1x, etc. across the top of the presses. The ceiling drop cord is find for just about any tool other than the TS
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, March 16, 2013 9:22:44 AM UTC-6, Puckdropper wrote:

I have a drop-down cord over the 4'X6' outfeed table, that's shared by 2 TS s (90 degrees to one another). Very handy when doing tasks that stretch ac ross the whole span - outfeed table plus the Ts's side tables make for a 6' X8' area.

place to run a dust collection pipe. Puckdropper
I have 2 tree trunk posts (supporting a beam that supports the open ceiling joists/roof, i.e., I removed the walls inside the (old house) shop). Each post has outlets (easier to reach than on the ceiling, if need be) and peg s/nails for hanging handy tools - miter guages, push sticks, a few clamps ( specific for the drill press area).
Since I'm still remodeling the house into a shop, the posts will likely be moved, for accommodating relocating the TSs and/or work bench, later. I th ought this moving and relocating might happen, so I played out some extra w iring, to and above the posts, to accommodate any future redecorating. *On e of these posts is inconvenient for one of my saws.
Your drop down post(s) may not be for ceiling support, but consider giving yourself some extra wiring and/or other "utilities", up above, in case you want to move/adjust the post(s), later.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

Good suggestion. I have a couple of ceiling drops in my shop in the central area where I have TS, joiner, dust collector, drum sander and router table. Wall outlets around the perimeter too. I find the ceiling drops very handy, best not located directly over a machine though.
I first started hanging power from the overhead in about 1963. I had a photo studio, lights on stands with casters. Cords and casters don't mix well so I strung aircraft cable end wall to end wall, three strands per side, tensioned with turnbuckles (damn near pulled down the frame wall, the other was concrete block). I used power cable the length of the room, formed it into loops and hung it from the cables with metal rings, one per loop and tying the power cords to the rings. Each power line was plugged into a wall outlet, other end hung maybe 60" in the air. I could move anyone most anywhere and hook a light to it, loops straighten out when moved.. When not in use, they could just be shoved back to the end wall. Worked well, ceiling was 12+'.
I intend to do something similar in my shop but will use a lazy "C" shape curtain track attached to the ceiling and plastic slugs that fit it. What I need is some coil cord that I can use as ends for the power cables. Coil cord because the shop ceiling is lower, want to keep the power cord ends as high as possible but still be able to reach them. I can find coil cord but w/o a ground, want the ground. Someday...
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
. What I

Look for a "camping" or other retractable clothesline reel. Hang it from your track, add a clamp to hold the receptacle or plug on the end of the retractable reel. A stick with a hook eye will be handy for pulling it down from a fully retracted position. Extra loops midway around the cord to the line will keep it "flaked up high out of the way while retracted.
--
Jim in NC


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/16/2013 5:51 PM, Morgans wrote:

You may wish to consider the spiral cords like they use to put on telephones. (You do remember telephones, don't you)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Keith Nuttle" wrote in message

Funny... I just replaced the corded phone in my shop today.... The handset was cracked and the cord wouldn't stay connected properly. Corded phones are a self defense move... There are four corded phones in the house so they cannot walk off like the cordless handsets perpetually do !
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Keith Nuttle wrote:

Yep. Saw a loft converstion to a 1 (large) room apartment. There was only one electrical outlet in the room and it was centered on the ceiling. The apartment owner created wall outlets by stringing about six bright-orange curly extension cords from the one outlet to locations where power was needed (fridge, TV, etc.). Looked wierd, but nice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/16/2013 2:05 AM, Gramp's shop wrote:

will soon be moving out of the single stall I now call home. This means a fixed location for most of my machinery, especially the TS (soon to be equipped with a fixed outfeed table). Need to do the prep work first -- power distribution and lighting and a good plan for dust collection. Want to minimize wires on the floor and all the other crap that gets in the way of my feet.

Might I suggest putting every thing on a mobile base. I operated out of a 2 car garage for 30 years and when more equipment that ended up on mobile bases the more functional the shop became. I am now in a 3 car garage and believe even more strongly in mobile bases.
I often erect a 4'x 8' break down work surface. a permanently placed table saw would cramp working quarters. STILL there is no "best place" for the table depending on the type cut.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 03/16/2013 07:13 AM, Leon wrote:

Leon,
Do use a 4' x 8' web of 1xfours or 2xfours or a panel covered with styrofoam?
--
"Socialism is a philosophy of failure,the creed of ignorance, and the
gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/16/2013 9:35 AM, Doug Winterburn wrote:

Actually I have a couple of the light weight plastic saw horses that I have had for several years. I have 2, 8' 2x4' running over them with notches to lock on top of the saw horses. Then 4, 3.5' 2x4s evenly spaced and half lapped with the long 2x4s. Shockingly sturdy, I have had in excess of 8 sheets of plywood/MDF on top.
Normally I have a couple of half sheets of 3/4" plywood on top of the 2x4s to serve as a work surface. 2 halves are easier to move around. I typically set this up in about 2~3 minutes.
When bringing new sheet goods into the shop I will leave the half sheets of ply wood off and stack the new plywood directly out of the truck on to the 2x4 grid. Last sheet gets a sheet of insulating styrofoam below it. ;~) I then cut the sheets into manageable sizes and or finished sizes. Using my Woodpeckers Deluxe 4' Story Stick I get very accurate cuts with the track saw. Last sheet gets cut directly on top of the 2x4s.
As a side note I have always wanted a nice work bench however this crude looking set up seems to fill the bill and does not take up much space when knocked down.
You can kinda sorta see it here.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8536729515/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You probably can't afford a nice workbench after buying all of those parallel clamps at ~$40 each... ;o)
Larry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I got the Cabinet Master clamps for about $17 each so I loaded up.. This was several years ago when the screw clamp end was made from aluminum. Jorgensen switched to cast iron when the aluminum failed. With a lifetime guarantee all 10 clamp ends were replaced for free. No problems sense.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/17/2013 9:48 AM, Leon wrote:

Me too from Woodcraft on a special. bought 4 of each size. Mine have not failed, didn't know the reason for the black ones? What caused the aluminum to fail? Did yours fail or you were just pre-emptive?
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They were failing on one at a time and they replaced them one by one for the first three. Next two failed and they asked how many more aluminum ones that I had and they decided to replace the rest and be done with it.
They replaced 2 iron ones because of a gritty feel when you tightened the clamp down. I later discovered that a drop of oil internally where the swivel pad is attached to the screw makes them work like new again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/17/2013 1:15 PM, woodchucker wrote:

To answer your other questions. The ones that failed were not painted. If yours are painted they are probably cast iron and the latest version, so to speak. It was explained to me that there were small voids in the aluminum casting and that created weak spots.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.