Hanging used solid core doors


I got my hands on 30 finished solid core doors including hinges and Schlage locks. They are mortised and drilled. No Jams! I could buy pine and make the jams, but I really don't like pine. Birch would go with the remainder of the woodwork in the house, but at $3 - $4 a board foot for rough cut in varying widths, and all the work in preparation, it will cost a fortune and take forever.
Would birch ply be strong enough, and hard enough, to withstand the wear and tear of daily living? The surface that shows would be hardwood. Very little of the edges show and could easily be finished with 1/4 inch strips of real birch.
Len
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snipped-for-privacy@uiuc.edu wrote:

considering that most doors these days have particleboard jambs, plywood is certainly strong enough. you'll need to shim behind the hinges, and remove one of the hinge screws on the top hinge and replace it with a long screw into the framing.
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Birch ply would probably be strong enough. You might check with your local lumber yard or BORG to see if they might have veneered jambs available. You should be able to find a maple veneered jamb that would be quite a bit less money than solid stock but probably still a little higher than plywood.
Mike O.
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Mike O. wrote:

I hope you are able to buy better ply than I can. I would be too worried about voids under the hinge mortise, or voids where the screws would bite.
Are you staining or painting these?
Robert
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Leon wrote:

I really on see wood. Mostly some kind of Chilean cousin of pine that is hard as a rock. I am doing a lot of installs and finishing of interior and exterior doors of a local lumberyard and I have steered them away from particle board and anything else.
By the time they figured out the price between the mystery South American hardwood and the particle board it wasn't that great, and if the mystery wood is to painted (like you would MDF) they use the cheap finger jointed stuff anyway.
The custom doors they make or sell have hardwood jambs to match the doors, but that has gotten so expensive due to the cost of solid jamb material that most people opt out and just get paint grade frames.
I hate the MDF frames as it almost double the amount of shims I have to put in. That stuff is so limber and moves so much (even with one coat of primer and two coats finish) that you really have to secure it. It is hard to get and keep the margins really straight.
So I charge enough extra on the installation of MDF frames to make it worthwhile for their customers to pick the wood frames. Kinda helps things go in the right direction.
Robert
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I guess that could be WSYP, Way Southern Yellow Pine, ;~)
I am doing a lot of installs and finishing of

I was totally unaware that non solid wood door jams were available. In Houston I have only seen solid wood jams, I certainly would not want a door hanging on less especially with a solid core door. I can understand MDF doors as you can use a longer screw to secure the hinge to the door however the jam side of the hinge cannot use a long screw unless as you well know you replace all the screws after installation.
Thanks for the info.
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Leon wrote:

Here's the rub. When the door has been hung and the shims are in, the shims are roughly 24 inches apart on a three hinge door with shims under each hinge. However, with MDF jambs, they will easily move and torque even with shims 24" apart, and the trims properly nailed.
With longer screws that go into the door buck stud you can torque the jamb if there is the slightest imperfection in your shim fit.
I hang my doors the old fashioned way, using long wedges from each side at the hinges. Scribe and cut the wedges to fit after the door is in its proper place, and more nails in the jamb, and a couple of 16 ga 2 1/2 " brads in each shim.
However, I discovered that when I countersink a large finish nail that doesn't go exactly through the center of the wedge, I can literally bend the MDF jamb around smaller shims (3" or so) when I am setting the nails. Now THAT makes a nasty installation.
Robert Those MDF jambs suck for too many
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No Doubt.
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On 9 Aug 2006 22:58:09 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Don't mean to sound dense, but is there a "new" way to do it that doesn't involve the method you describe? As far as I know, that's the only way to do it, except I usually use trim screws instead of finish nails.

Agreed. I usually shim every 12" when a customer insists on a prehung to get around that (as noted in another post, all of them are particleboard -not even MDF- around here) Still isn't as good as a real jamb, but I figure shims are cheap, and it's better than nothing.

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Prometheus wrote:

SNIP
I don't know of a new way that is better, but when visiting one of my fellow contractors that do a lot of bulk installation I went over and looked at how the install the doors they put in for a builder here in town. He was a little embarassed, but he told me they had been doing it this way for so long he didn't really think of it anymore. Here's how it goes:
- put the trim (his came trimmed one side) on one side of the door
- put the door in the hole, line up the margins correctly, and shoot the trim to the cripple on the side that you have it on
- cram "stuff" in under the hinges (cardboard, plywood, sheeetrock, masonite siding, etc.) and shoot a couple of long brads through the "stuff" called by them as shims
- Bonus: if it is an outside door, it is required that they put a shim under the door lock area
- put the trim on the other side
- done
It helps me understand why my door rehav business is so good.
Robert
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IMHO until you get into the plywood's that cost about the same as solid wood, plywood looks like plywood regardless of whether you hide the edges or not.
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hardwood finish, then get the birch, maple, beech or even alder or pine if money is that tight. Go cheap now and regret it later.
Dave
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