Hang on to that sucker!!

I need to do a couple of raised panel doors for a cabinet to match existing doors in the bathroom. I have a PC 7539 router, the 3-1/4 HP, five speed monster they make. The raised panel bit is 3-1/2 inches in diameter. You all got the picture so far?? Anyway, I got the router set up in the table, grabbed a piece of scrap to do I test run. I hung on pretty tight as I figured that minster router and huge bit were going to grab pretty good! I was right, I still have not found that piece of scrap!! The sucker went flying into some cluttered coner of the shop. All I know for sure is the piece scrap was there, and a fraction of a second later it was gone, and I heard it bounce off the wall somewhere to my right! I think I need to practice this some more, and maybe get the fence on, instead off the pin, and take a few more passes! The best part is all fingers are still intact! Greg
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Get the fence on. Make the cuts in multiple passes, raising the bit each time. Spin it at a slow speed. I have the same set up and have no problems doing it this way.
Greg O wrote:

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I was thinking of setting the bit at the finished height. Using a fence, and moving the fence away, say 1/8" or 1/4" per pass. I was using a starter pin, but not a good idea! Man! That router has some power! After I did make a pass or two I was still suprised how much pull it had on the stock! It swings that 3-1/2" bit through the red oak like nothing! Greg
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Greg O writes:

Yeah, well...it's false rating to call it 3+ HP, more likely a real 1-1/2, but if you think you can outgrip or outpull 1-1/2 horses, take a trip to a draft horse pull some time and see if someone will let you hold the reins as one of those immense animals plods away with many hundreds of pounds on a sleigh or stone boat.
Any time you're around something that size, you are glad they were born gentle!
Treat that router table with respect. Next time, the fingers could get chewed up or broken.
Starter pins are great for smaller edging cuts in arcs and circles. They're not for the immense full cuts with the big bits, IMO. Keep it to no more than 1/8" or 1/4", as you note, if you're doing cathedral pattern panel raising. And I'd edge up on 1/4" because hand strength varies widely.
Charlie Self "It is not strange... to mistake change for progress." Millard Fillmore
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme says...

One of the original definitions for 1 horsepower was the energy required to raise 1 US Ton 1000 feet high in one hour.
<http://auto.howstuffworks.com/horsepower1.htm has an interesting history of the definition. The one I used above is from a book I read years ago that had a series of memory aids to help remember units, most of them silly, but they got the job done.
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but
draft
of
or
Yes, I realize PC is using "Sears" HP rating this animal!! Pretty typical for router HP. Greg
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Greg,
instead of moving and resetting the fence each pass..set your bit to the finished height...place two 1/4" pieces of plywood about 3 x 16 over the router bit and fence...make the first pass....remove one piece of plywwod...make the second pass...remove the second piece of ply and then finish the cut...this way you are not moving the fence taking a chance of not setting the fence correctly and each panel will all be perfect and the right size...... good luck, Mike from American Sycamorer
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The bit has a pilot bearing, so I was not concerned about the final position of the fence. Still not a bad idea. Greg
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<snip> Don't know what the idea of raising the bit each time is?
Set the cutter to finished hight, I normally take 3 occasionally 4 passes moving the fence in each time. If you are making arched doors, do the bottom and left edge (with the panel in the cutting position), remove the right half of the fence then do the arch, the crown to the fence and the undercut left side allows the bearing to reach the curve safetly and prevents grabbing.
Bernard R
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Bernard Randall wrote:

Plan A, Plan B. The basic idea is to remove a little material each pass, not all at once. My set up doesn't allow for a super adjustable fence. So, up the bit goes 'til final height. YMMV, there is no single way to do a job, etc, etc. And that, my friend, is the idea of "raising the bit each time."
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<snip>

It was not intended as a criticsm, I take it you are using a bit without a backcutter?? Though I'm using the CMT set which is about 3 1/2" dia I have found that accurate fence setting isn't necessary, even on the final cut as long as the fence is behind the bearing. In my own case I don't have a 3 1/2" hole in my plate so I don't have the option. I accept that you skin the cat as you see fit, the method I outlined is independent of there being a back-cutter.
Bernard R
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That's a good one, but April Fool's day was yesterday.
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Use the fence and some longer stock for your test piece please!

existing
all
do
huge
that
a
my
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Sounds as if you had some assistance from the router bit. Were you feeding the piece the same direction as the bit was turning or against the rotation of the bit ?
Greg O wrote:

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Against rotation. Since my first post I whipped togather a fence from some scrap 3/4" melamine. World of differance! Greg
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