Handplane Terminology

I've been following the recent threads on handplane usage and find some terms to be confusing or at least I don't know exacty what they mean. Would someone explain when one or more of the following can be applied to a particular plane?
Bench Plane Jack Plane Fore Plane Smoother Jointer Scrub
Thanks Woodpecker
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Woodpecker asks:

Check the URL in my signature. It may help some.
Charlie Self "To create man was a quaint and original idea, but to add the sheep was tautology." Mark Twain's Notebook http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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I added my 2 cents below
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http://users.adelphia.net/~kyhighland


"Woodpecker" < snipped-for-privacy@myway.com> wrote in message
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to
In terms of Stanley Plane numbers a smoother is a #1 through #4 (at least I think #1 and #2 are included but since I don't have them and don't want them, that part is an assumption), a #5 is a jack plane (around 14 - 15 inches range), a #6 is a fore plane, and #7 and #8 planes are jointers.
A scrub is around the size of a larger smoother (I use a converted #3 as a scrub) but it is different in that it has a convex rounded iron that makes rounded valley instead of a flat bottomed cut.
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Cheers,
Howard
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You Dont want a #1 Or A # 2? I d like to have them both just to have them. Tony D.

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Anthony Diodati wrote:

Me too, but I can't see spending the several thousand dollars it would take to own original Stanleys in good condition!
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To reply, change the chemical designation to its common name.


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True, Might all get lucky someday. Tony d.

them.
take to

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"Anthony Diodati" wrote ...

Nope. I like using my tools and my big mitt would never be able to hang on to one of those suckers. Besides, the price would sure cover lumber for a lot of projects.
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Howard
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Oh Yes, But I would like to have them just cause the neat. Tony D.

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"Anthony Diodati" wrote ...

You got me there. A friend of mine has quite an assortment of them. I'm afraid to look at them. That #1 is so small it's scary.
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Howard
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In general, a plane intended for working with the grain, with the blade mounted "bevel up". The classic shaped tool that you would think of when someone says "plane". The other large group of planes is block planes, which are smaller planes intended for working across the grain.
All of the following are bench planes:

An intermediate sized plane, intended for coarser tasks like the initial smoothing of a board.

A plane in between a jack & jointer in size, usually used as a jointer for smaller work.

A smaller plane, with a very narrow mouth and very sharp blade, used for final smoothing and finishing of the work.

A very long plane, used for making an edge totally straight or a surface perfectly flat.

A jack sized plane, configured for very coarse work. Used to quickly remove material, in order to bring a piece of stock close it's final dimension.
John
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Bevel up? Really? Not in my shop.
-Jack
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I've seen this here before. Bench planes are bevel down, with a chip breaker for most, but not the scrub. See horrible ascii art below.
Bevel ------------------------------------------------ -------->> / / /
/ -------------------------------------------------------------------------
The bevel is up on block planes, and they do not need or use a chipbreaker. On a bench plane, the bedding angle is the total included angle to the work surface. On a block plane, the bedding angle plus the bevel angle is the total included angle. Metal bench planes are mostly set at 45 degrees, though some smoothers are higher, such as 47.5, 50 (York pitch) and more. Standard angle block planes are bedded at 20 degrees, so a 25 degree bevel gives 45 degrees. Low angle block planes can be anywhere less than that, but 12 and 18 degrees bedding anble are common values, resulting in included angles of 37 and 43 degrees.
Cheers, Eric
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Dang it. Lesson 1 - proof read your posts. Lesson 2 - don't try and talk about bench planes and block planes in the same paragraph :-)
John
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At least when the plane is upside-down! <g>
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Alex
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Woodpecker wrote:

http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan1.htm Blood and Gore is a very informative site. You'd do yourself a lot of good, as well as get some enjoyment, from taking the time to read through it. It has a terrific amount of info about all the types of Stanley planes as well as some others. It's a good read. Dave in Fairfax
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reply-to doesn't work
use:
daveldr at att dot net
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