Hand Tools to Supplement Power Tool Focused Shop?

For a developing woodworker/carpenter, early in the hobby, assembling a stationary power tool and hand power tool focused shop what key hand tools should be added to the tool complement for a fully flexible shop? My project focus is medium sized cabinet/bookcase/table type construction. The objective will be machine and jig generated joinery rather than hand generated joinery! I am tackling carpentry and woodworking tasks with equal intensity.
Philly
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 16 Jan 2005 21:16:17 GMT, "philly"

A low angle block plane, medium shoulder plane, 3 or 4 bench chisels (1/4, 1/2, 3/4, and maybe a 1"), a scraper, and sharpening equipment are a good start. Some good rasps can come later. Even if you like to sand, a decent scraper is great for fixing finish errors, and a good one isn't expensive.
I don't count measuring and marking tools as you need them in any sort of woodworking.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 16 Jan 2005 22:55:10 GMT, Ba r r y

A good scraper is about dirt cheap! That's why I have so many of them. A scraper is only a piece of good quality tool steel with an edge hooked onto it.
Although it wasn't part of your original question, I'd strongly urge you to take the time to learn to sharpen/burnish a hook on your scraper(s)
To the list above, I'd add two hand saws: A backsaw or a Japanese pull-stroke saw and a coping saw. The backsaw/Japanese saw is invaluable when you're making joints or doing other finicky jobs. The coping saw is a fast, cheap substitute for a bandsaw on a lot of simple jobs.
--RC

"Sometimes history doesn't repeat itself. It just yells 'can't you remember anything I've told you?' and lets fly with a club. -- John W. Cambell Jr.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ba r r y wrote:

Good list, but if you are working in solid wood something to tweak joints, and flatten panels is invaluable; for instance, a jack plane or jointer or preferably both. Actually a smoother, jack and jointer are a truly wonderful accompaniment to power tools, filling in where the power tools fall short.
PK
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 16 Jan 2005 21:16:17 GMT, "philly"

Look down about 20 posts or so, I have just reposted the Hand Tool FAQ which covers your question quite well.
Groggy ---------------- A friend will bail you out of jail, but a true friend will be sitting next to you, saying, "That was ****ing awesome!".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A good 6" square Set of bench chisels + one chisel you don't care as much about Low angle block plane + Jack plane Flush cut saw + Dokuzi
philly said the following on 1/16/2005 3:16 PM:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks to all for the great suggestions.
Philly

tools
The
equal
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.