Hand tingles from using vibrating tools

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I was wondering if it's normal for your hand to tingle for a few days after using sanders, grinders or tools that vibrate a lot. I only use them occasionaly around the house but the tingles can go on for days. Is this normal?
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smith snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

no.
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BigEgg
Hack to size. Hammer to fit. Weld to join. Grind to shape. Paint to cover.
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wrote:

It was when I was developing carpal tunnel syndrome. 8^(
Get anti-vibration gloves pronto, and possibly see an orthopedic doctor. CPS is easily repairable in many cases if caught early.
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smith snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Hmm, simple answer - no, but... I have been diagnosed with some minor nerve damage to my left arm and hand after years of keyboarding. When I use power tools that vibrate - sanders, etc. my left hand will tingle a lot. That being said, I'm not a doctor, but suggest you might want to do the following:
1) Use gloves. They work for me at times. Helps to dampen the vibration.
2) Get a nerve test.
Good luck.
MJ Wallace
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My hand will sometimes tingle for a few MINUTES after using an RO sander, but I'd say a few days is not normal. Of course I'm not a doctor, so I'll suggest you go see one. Andy
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How long does it tingle for, or is it dependant on how long you use the tool for?
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Mine will tingle for a few hours but I don't recall it going longer than that. I find that wearing a pair of gel-filled bicycle gloves helps.
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smith snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Not sure if it's normal, but it's not unusual. The older you are the more usual the "frayed" nerves will be. Wear gloves with gel-palms and don't hold the tools in a death grip. Change your grip frequently and take breaks.
R
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smith snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

For a minute or two, yes.
For days, no. It's an early sign of something worse to come, possibly preventable.
Probably it is best to see a doctor now, and take precations like padded gloves, wrist braces and so on.
--

FF


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smith snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in

Yes it's normal for tools that vibrate A LOT. Don't use those tools, replace them with tools that don't vibrate as much. We've got a palm sander that's never used because it vibrates too much, while the 1/4 sheet sander gets occasional use (usually by the time I'd to 100 grit I'm hand sanding) that doesn't vibrate nearly as badly.
In my high school shop, I've been known to spend an entire week sanding with a palm sander (50 minutes a day) with no ill-effect to my hands and arms.
Puckdropper
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smith snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Hi guys and thanks for the replies. I was grinding concrete yesterday for a couple hours. My left hand still tingles from that. It's hard to tell if it's gotten any better, but I thought I remember this happening to me when I was sanding a while ago.
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smith snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in wrote:

Patient: "Doctor, it hurts when I do that."
Doctor: "Then don't DO that."
The body will do things that aren't good for it. Your brain is there to figure out a better way, before you break your body.
Patriarch
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Definitely not good:
From http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey 713
Definition of Hand-arm vibration syndrome
Hand-arm vibration syndrome: A disorder resulting from prolonged exposure to vibration, specifically to the hands and forearms while using vibrating tools. Symptoms include numbness, tingling, and loss of nerve sensitivity. The hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) is a painful and potentially disabling condition of the fingers, hands, and arms due to vibration. There is initially a tingling sensation with numbness in the fingers. The fingers then become white and swollen when cold and then red and painful when warmed up again. Cold or wet weather may aggravate the condition. Picking up objects such as pins or nails becomes difficult as the feeling in the fingers diminishes and there is loss of strength and grip in the hands. The pain, tingling, and numbness in the arms, wrists and hands may interfere with sleep. Sources of vibration that can cause HAVS are very varied and include pneumatic drills, jackhammers, asphalt breakers, power chain saws, chipping tools, concrete vibrators and levelers, needle guns and scabblers, polishers, power jigsaws, sanders and angle grinders, riveters, compactors, power lawnmowers and even electronic games in which the hand controls vibrate. HAVS was first widely recognized as a potential occupational hazard in the mid-1980s. It was first known as "vibration white finger."
From Cal-OSHA: http://www.cdc.gov/elcosh/docs/d0200/d000259/d000259.html
1. Vibration from tools can damage the blood vessels in your hands and fingers. The reduced blood supply can then harm the skin, nerves, and muscles. You lose feeling in your hands and fingers, and cant control them. This is called hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS), and is also known as white finger, dead finger, or Raynauds Syndrome. Its very important to watch for early symptoms and report them. What are the signs to watch for?
Tingling fingers Fingertips turn white or blue Trouble picking up small objects Reduced sense of heat, cold, and pain in hands. Numbness Clumsiness with hands Trouble buttoning and zipping clothes 2. Vibration isnt the only thing that can reduce the blood supply to your hands and fingers. Your chance of getting HAVS goes up if youre exposed to vibration combined with other risk factors that also cut down the blood supply. Do you know what some of those risk factors are?
Cold Loud noise Tobacco smoke. 3. Is there any protective gear you can wear to prevent exposure to vibration? Not really. There are gloves with vibration-damping material built into the palms and fingers. But they havent been proven effective. If they fit well and dont cause you to grip tighter, it doesnt hurt to try them. Regular work gloves and warm clothing are important in cold weather to avoid getting your hands cold or wet. Remember that cold increases your risk. Hearing protection is important in noisy environments, and many vibrating tools are very loud. Remember that noise increases your risk. Always wear safety glasses or other eye/face protection when you work with any tool. 4. Are there tools that reduce your exposure to vibration? Yes. The best solution is to do the work with a non-vibrating tool instead of a vibrating one if you can. For example, sometimes you can mill or machine a part instead of using a grinder. If you do use a vibrating tool, use one that has anti-vibration features built in whenever possible. Some new designs can reduce tool vibration over 50%. But tool suppliers should be asked for real evidence that their equipment reduces vibration. Vibration is reduced when tools are well maintained. Tools that are worn, blunt, or misaligned vibrate more. Immediately report any tool that is functioning poorly. 5. Are there any other ways to reduce exposure to vibration? Limit the amount of time you use vibrating tools (both hours per day and days per week) wherever possible. Take a 10-minute break for every hour that you spend working with a vibrating tool. Or alternate work with vibrating and non-vibrating tools. Let the tool do the work. Keep your grip as loose as possible while still keeping control of the tool. A tight grip restricts blood flow, and also allows more vibration to pass from the tool to the body. Dont use full throttle unless you need to.
From HSB: Hey, let's be careful out there.
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Is this what I have? But my finger tips don't turn white in the cold and are not numb. Could 2 hours of the grinder really cause all of this? Or is this something that happens from repeated exposure? (this is not my occupation, I sit in front of a computer all day).
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Sure can, especially if you don't do it on a regular basis.
Try to get some benefit from it. Hold your tool and see if you can make it tingle. :)
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I missed this the first time.
More reason it could be carpal tunnel syndrome.
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smith snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Do you seriously want someone who is not a doctor to diagnose you without even seeing you?

Uh huh. You could also be in the early stages of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. I have a neighbor with MS and her first symptoms were much like yours.
So there are three very different possibilities and no one online can tell you if you have any of the three or something else entirely.
--

FF


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On 5 Nov 2006 13:52:04 -0800, smith snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Probably not.
I don't generally have any problems with my hands, but I've had long periods of tingling after doing a stretch of work that I'm not accustomed to. If you ask me, moving from working in from of a computer to grinding concrete for a few hours is bound to cause some discomfort of some sort. But the odds of getting perminent damage from doing it once or even a couple of times seems pretty low.
If you were running a jackhammer all day every day, I imagine it would be a different story.
You can always go see a doctor if it's really bad, but I wouldn't lose any sleep over it, myself.
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That's the reason.

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I would say that tingles that "go on for days" is not normal after just occasional use. I get some tingles after using certain power tools too, but if it lasted for days I would be concerned.
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Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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