Hand rail

I have a closed staircase on both sides . What side do I put the hand rail on?? Right going up or right coming down?? Any code on that? Thanks for your input. Tom
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On Oct 13, 8:51 am, TOM snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (TOM MOORE) wrote:

Nope. Whatever works best for you.
R
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When I was building my storage above the Garage Tom, the inspector ordered a Handrail, but he didn't care which side. So I guess it was no code about beeing left or right, however I end up to put on both sides, it is much nicer. But if you have to put on one side only, I would put on right side up. I use the rail more when I go up rather then down and using right hand is easier, unless you are left hander.
MaxEN
TOM MOORE wrote:

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On Fri, 13 Oct 2006 07:51:40 -0500, TOM snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (TOM MOORE) wrote:

I live in a house with a basement garage, and on the stairs from the basement, the rail is on the right going up (on the hinge side of the door at the top), which allows one to hold onto the rail and door handle at the same time. The rail on the stairs to the second floor is on the left - the only continuous wall.
I would look to see if there is any reason that one side or the other is better. If not, put it on the side that "feels" good. (Use the force, Luke)
Bill
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Well, put it in the middle and you can use either hand either direction. If it's only 3 feet wide, it might be a bit tight. Respectfully, Ron Moore I know, it just came to mind when I saw your post.

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Oh ok Thanks guys..
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....unless you want to slide down...lol

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TOM MOORE wrote:

well, lessee...
you have to be able to have your hand on the rail anytime you have a foot on a step. so if your staircase has a winder in it with a wide tread you will probably have to have the rail on the inside of the curve- unless of course the stairwell wall curves through the winder. that'd be cool but more cost and work to build.... winders are a bit of a bitch in that the riser height stays constant but the tread run length varies from one side to the other through the curve (the treads are wedge shaped). think of it as a section of spiral staircase connecting two straight runs of stair and you've got it. the walking path through the curve has to remain with the same run and rise as the straight sections, and with the rail the same height and distance away throughout. it takes a bit of layout to get a winder to walk right. the result is a staircase that can fit into less floor area than one with a landing. they are a bit dangerous for children and old people so be careful where you use them.
if there is a landing with a doorway in it you will probably have to have the rail on the opposite side of the stairway, unless, I guess the landing is pretty large so that the doorway isn't within reach of the stairs.
if the treads are longer than a certain amount, I forget what, you have to have rails on both sides.
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