Hand planing better

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bugbear wrote:

It's always nice to see your contributions.

That's what I figured.

I couldn't keep up with Oldtools and I just sort of drifted away when Badger Pond became WoodCentral. I guess the only thing that keeps me here is that it's usually pretty easy to find the handtool threads and I figure I'm helping keep alive the spirit of folks like O'Deen (who hepled me so much when I was starting down the slope).
Chuck Vance
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Conan the Librarian wrote:

And, boy, did you end up at the bottom :-)
BugBear
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bugbear wrote:

I guess that's a matter of perspective. :-)
Chuck Vance Just say (tmPL) To borrow from a great blues song: I'm down so far that it looks like up to me.
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I think he means about the 'making it to the bottom', where your stuck in the "ubliet" of that which you love, you've made it to the top... in essence.
:-)
Alex
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On Tue, 21 Sep 2004 07:43:47 -0500, Conan the Librarian

put your carving benchlet on the floor and stand on it to lower your main bench?
I suppose ... *if the heights were right... *if you didn't do much hand sawing... *if floor space was at a premium.... it might be the right thing....

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Never Enough Money) wrote in message

Coming in late but here's another reference: the <Bench Tools> book in *The Best of FWW* series has the piece by Drew Langston, though titled "Body Mechanics and the Trestle Workbench". The article makes reference to Japanese woodworking techniques as the souce of the bench design. Accompanying pics show it to be above the knee, but not quite middle of the thigh. Two trestles, with both a thick beam (to chop against, etc.) and a thinner board (to hold tools) spanning them. Langston pull-planes, chisels and saws at the bench, using different postures. When chiseling, for instance, he half-sits on the bench, clamping the work with thigh and shin. When planing, he uses a full width stop to secure the work and stands at the end of the bench.
The book also features a piece on the 18th century joiners' bench, and one on a more contemporary "classic" bench with shoulder and tail vises.
I'm just beginning to move away from the tubi and plywood stage. This book gave me much to think about. Got it on eBay for just a few bucks.
Good luck, Never Enough; it's been fun reading about your experiment.
Dan
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Never Enough Money) wrote in message
...

It's a good book. Helped me a lot when I was building my bench. Your local library probably has it, or they can get it by interlibrary loan.
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