hand plane technique

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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Fred the Red Shirt) writes:
[...]

But beech is still "soft" compared to wenge, where i could not get real "shavings" but only small stuff that looks like sawdust. Heck, the plane seemed to skid over the wood as if it was harder than the iron!
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Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869

Ain't that the truth! I get a few shavings off of Wenge, but mostly it just crumbles. I tried putting it throught the old Delta 12" Snipemeister, but it turn it's nose up. Wouldn't even grab the wood. I thought I was going to have to clean up the rollers, but I tried a couple of other species (red oak and walnut), and they ran through just fine. Wenge is beautiful stuff, but hard to work is an understatement.
Cheers, Eric
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Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869

Beech is even soft compared to maple. The issue with beech is that it seems to resist splitting so well that as you push the plane it feels like if you let go it would spring back at you. It makes good shavings but if you do a project in beech you can expect to have arms like a truck driver by the time you're done planing.
--

FF

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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Fred the Red Shirt) wrote:

Man, that's the truth! Ever split it by hand for firewood? Talk about _work_!
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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Doug Miller wrote:

No, can't say as I have. There's a beech tree somewhere in the woods near hear. I've seen beechnuts, but never picked out the tree. That's about as close to knowing anything about the species as I come.
Having said all that useless stuff, I'll pit your beech against my 2' diameter red gum crotch and we'll see who breaks the most mauls. Took us two years to split that damn thing, going out to whack on it whenever we got pissed off.
Helped the McIntyre family get through my teenage years. I don't know whether Dad or I got the most whacks in, but I was the one who finally split it.
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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With results like that you might try planing blindfolded. Picking a direction at random is right half the time.
-Jack
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Congradulations. You got it in one.
--

FF

"Did I forget a smiley?"

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Mike, If your 200+ lb bench is moving around on you, then I can think of two potential problems off the top of my head. The feet of your bench aren't making real good contact with the floor, or perhaps the bench isn't balanced well.
What kind of floor is your bench sitting on? If it's a very smooth concrete garage floor, then the feet are likely to slip around. Been there done that. An easy solution is to glue some thin neoprene to the bottoms of the feet. I actually used neoprene-impregnated cork. Worked great. An even more definitive and still not irreversible solution is to drill a couple holes in the floor, bolt/screw some angle iron to the legs and then drop carriage bolts through the brackets into the holes in the floor. There's no need to bolt the bench to the floor, as there's not a lot of chance you'll be applying much upward force to the bench (and even if you did, at 200lbs, it'd be tough to lift).
Later, if you need to move the bench, simply lift out the carriage bolts and go.
If you're on a wooden floor, just glue some 36 grit sand paper to the bottoms of your bench's feet. It won't go anywhere after that.
As for balance, how wide apart are the legs (of the bench, not you)? If you're planing way out on the corner of your bench (like where that face vise is mounted), then you could have a problem with bench wanter to teeter. And if it's teetering, it's gonna want to scoot around on you.
You mentioned you were applying a lot of lateral force while planing the edge of a board? Why? You can angle the plane as you move along the edge, but this is generally to shorten the effective lenght of the board (and to skew the iron, lowering it's effective cutting angle). One of Ian Kirby's tricks to eschew a face vise alltogether when edge-jointing (not always practical, when jointing a wide board). He just plops the board against a stop. Then if his plane is tilted, or if he's applying any unneeded lateral force, the board will flop over. Talk about an effective feedback system.
As for BAD's problem with his flimsy vise - expensive is once, cheap is forever. Use a board jack to support the end of the board. Better yet, buy any book you can by Frank Klausz, Tage Frid and/or Ian Kirby.
O'Deen
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On Mon, 10 Nov 2003 14:52:25 GMT, "Mike in Mystic"

How much diagonalisation is there ?
My bench is a failure. 2" oak top on a 4"x4" larch frame with 8" deep stretchers and the damn thing racks back and forth like a laundry airer. You just can't use a rectilinear frame to support a big sideways load like planing.
We're both going to have to stick something diagonal up the back. -- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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wrote:

Are you just making up words here?

Tack some plywood on it.
-Jack
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Yes. There obviously is an appropriate word, but I'm too knackered to think what it is.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Funny, my rectilinear bench (4x4 legs, 2x8 stretchers top and bottom, solid core doo with maple T&G flooring laminated on top) supports any sideways load I plane at it.
Sharp blade, properly adjusted. Works a treat.
djb
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Um... That's solid core *DOOR*. I may not be an expert WW'er, but...
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Oops. Forgot the link...
<http://www.balderstone.ca/workbench/
djb
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Dave Balderstone writes:

Man, if that thing moves when you don't want it to, I don't want to play with your weight set.
Charlie Self
"Criticism may not be agreeable, but it is necessary. It fulfils the same function as pain in the human body. It calls attention to an unhealthy state of things." Sir Winston Churchill
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I can move it if I have to, but it tends to want to stay put.
djb
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Andy Dingley wrote:

That's what *she* said.
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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Mike:
Try glueing some 60 or 80 grit sandpaper under the legs. Theory is that overcoming friction has to happen before things can get moving.
charlie b
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Mike in Mystic wrote:

No one seems to be raising an eyebrow at this. Maybe I have the concept wrong, but it seemed to me that *soft* wood would be better for the vise faces. I used some very soft pine for mine, and they seem to be working out great. They have some give to them, and shouldn't ever mar anything.

I haven't ever tried to plane it, so I can't answer that. If you're moving your entire bench, chances are you're doing it wrong though. I've definitely moved my ~250 pound bench around while planing, but I'm finding that it's much less likely to happen now that I have a feel for what I'm doing, and have really got my planes tuned up. (Tuning should't be much of an issue for you with those spendy critters though.)
I'm very much still learning myself, but I've found big, bench-scooting catches usually mean...
* I'm planing against the grain * I'm trying to take off too much * I'm hitting a knot or really rough patch * I'm dealing with changing grain
Skewing the plane a bit helps considerably with rough patches and weird grain, but I have some boards with weird grain that I haven't figured out how to plane yet, and I've never touched anything more exotic than walnut.

Me too. I didn't even have a workmate, so I had to do some really unwieldy things.
My bench is non-standard in many ways, but the most curious thing is that I have two vises on the front. I bought a very cheap one just to have something. Once I got a taste for having a front vise, that gave me the incentive I needed to work at getting my beefy old (and free!) 7" Morgan vise restored to operating condition. I didn't see the point in throwing away the cheap vise, so I reinstalled it at the other end. With two front vises about 3' apart, I get a stable way to hold stuff on edge without having to screw with board jacks. I could use a tail vise, but so far I'm getting by OK using the pop-up dog on the Morgan to jam a board into oak dogs from the side. I haven't managed to dislodge a 4/4ish board with that setup yet, though it doesn't do very well at clamping really thin stock.
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