hand plane opportunity

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qwertyuiop'd:



Or here for $115: http://www.sydnassloot.com/P14.HTM
Cheers, Mike
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Mike wrote:

Bookmarked for future purchasees. thanks, Joe
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Sandy (the proprietor) is a good guy to deal with and really knows old tools (check out his bit brace collection/page). IMO, his prices are the best of all of the internet dealers; not as good as finding 25-cent planes in the wild but still pretty reasonable. No affiliation, yadda, yadda; just a satisfied customer.
Cheers, Mike
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That's true, Joe. The following already has arrived from that list:

The #4, #6 and #78 in my cabinet are non-list purchases. Sweet tools, all.
Patriarch
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On 16 Sep 2004 11:34:38 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Patrick Olguin) wrote:

I have a short bench and the workshop isn't much bigger. By the time I've got my #8 up to speed, I have to hit the brakes to stop it flying out through the end door.
I like my #6 though 8-)
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I agree with O'Deen. A couple of moths ago I came across an 80% off bin at Woodcraft. There in the bin was a Hock blade that looked to my untrained eye to be the right size for my Miller Falls #18 (a Stanley #6 clone). So I bought it for all of $8 or $9. Got it home and it was too wide - it was for a number 8. What to do, what to do. Went to ebay and found a nice older 8C that was in great shape except for that hole drilled through the sole at the back end (to hang it on the wall I guess). $50 and it came home. So now I have $59 +/- in a nice #8C with a Hock blade (not to mention a real nice older Stanley blade for a spare) and that thing can cut finer full length, full width shavings than any other plane I own. I think stories I had read about O'Deen and seeing him holding that #8 of his on the Blood & Guts page was the inspiration that made me buy the plane on ebay rather than sell the blade on ebay.
Dave Hall
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...sounds like the old British Magpie syndrome, a terrible addiction in such a monatary system!
Alex
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AArDvarK wrote:

I've seen brass adjustment knobs wear to excessively slack. You expect better from plastic?

Seller lost me right there.

Frankenplane.
$15.00 will get you an older and better #5, curable rust, 90% or better japanning.
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Sounds like a plane made up of different parts. Check out Patrick's Blood and Gore,[ http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0.htm ] but its my understanding that a Bakelite screw knob is WWII vintgage, but to be correct the lever cap would have the kidney shaped hole. The wooden tote and front knob, if WWII, would be made of painted or stained hardwood, and not Rosewood. Does it have a "low" front knob, or a "high" one, and is there a ring on the casting within which the fron knob fits? Generally, low knobs come with lever caps that have the keyhole, rather than the kidney shaped hole, but not always. Check to see if there is a frog adjustment screw below the Bakelite adjusting knob, if so, then its not WWII. You are correct the castings on WWII planes are thicker, and you generally see a less polished milling of the sides of these planes. I think there are some uncorrect parts on this plane and it is likely a tad overpriced for what it is. My first couple of old plane purchases were like this, and now I avoid them as I know better. If you keep your eyes open at fleas and garage sales, 5's are pretty common and can be gotten for $20 or oftentimes less, depending on condition.
As to someone's comment about WWII not being good users, well, they are if properly tuned. I've also never had a bakelite knob go bad either.
Mutt.

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I thank everyone for their input, I really appreciate the help. I bought this one no one else would bid for, it is a Stanley #5 of older type but it has a later lever cap with the kidney hole. Good enough as a user, it's got all the parts and even Magpie's brass adjustment knob too! Again thanks to all. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&itema17398096 Also this sweet Stanley #110, awesome condition: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&itema17608116 just got it [9-13-04].
Thanks again everyone,
Alex
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