Hammers

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I need some ordinary hammers (12, 16, 20 oz).
Are these tools in the "you get what you pay for" category?
Perhaps you could briefly explain why I should consider spending $70 or more, when I could probably find all 3 for around $10 at HF. If you can think of a reason related to safety (I'm afraid of flying metal) or the tool's lifetime I would be persuaded by that.
The 16oz claw hammer I've been using is sort of a family heirloom, having belonged to my grandfather. I have my grandfather's watch too, but I've been able to Use the hammer. And I think of Arkansas whenever I swing it. If my arm gets tired, that helps me swing it better.
Bill
BTW, Anyone heard of the MWTCA ("Midwest Tool Collectors Association")? Someone from the Indian state fair was handing out membership brochures in a antique tool booth. Here is a link to their website:
http://www.mwtca.org/the-gristmill.html
Also, yes it's true, you may have seen a video, a few hours after I left fair, at least 40 people were injured and 5 have died so far after the stage and scaffolding (and speakers, lights, etc.) blew over at 9 pm last night due to a gust of wind. The fair was closed today, reopens tomorrow.
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I see you already know the answer. Some 20+ years ago a fellow I know started building his house. He bought a half dozen cheap hammers for framing. The cheap hammers had broken handles or were otherwise gone in a couple of days.
Good hammers feel good in the hand, they strike and stay on the nail head, they last for decades. They just work better and are easier on the arm if you can get than nail in with less blows.
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On 8/15/2011 5:09 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

And, with the better hammers, you won't even know when you hit your thumb.
Guaranteed!
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
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Yeah, that's right! Similarly, in the medical field, sterile needles don't hurt. Only dirty needles hurt. Unless, maybe, they are Chinese sterile needles.
Sonny
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Git yerself an Estwing unit! I got a few of them some years ago and never thought much about any difference but try one of the old cheap ones now?...forget it! They are dangerous!
I'm not sure about better hammers making you senseless (2) though???
1------------ "Sonny" wrote in message wrote: And, with the better hammers, you won't even know when you hit your thumb.
Guaranteed!
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On 8/15/2011 2:32 AM, Bill wrote:

What are you going to use them for? Hanging the occasional picture, get a cheap one. Building a small building, get a better one.
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Bill wrote:

There's a subtle difference in the head shape of a "roofing hammer" and the other kind. If you're using a roofing hammer to drive ordinary nails, you'll have trouble.
Anyway, get a hammer that feels best in your hand, that has the most comfortable grip. Whether it comes from HF or one of the high-priced spreads is irrelevant regarding quality. Virtually all hammers on the market are indestructable, with handles that simply will not break unless used as an emergency pin to hold two railroad freight cars together. On a trip up a mountain pass. In the winter.
Hint #1: Take your new hammer and rub its head across some concrete to scratch up the face. The hammer will strike better.
Hint #2. Forget the hammer and get a palm nailer.
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On 8/15/2011 6:58 AM, HeyBub wrote:

I think I would be more concerned with the head of the hammer shattering and sending out metal splinters if it were a cheap Chinese hammer. If I were using the hammer to do more than hang pictures I think I would go with a safer, quality hammer.
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On 8/15/2011 8:09 AM, Leon wrote:

I suspect that your categories "Cheap Chinese" and "Quality" are irrelevant as I suspect there are no hammers made in the US today.
I think that unless you buy a hammer at the Dollar Store, you will not have to worry about the head shattering, and even those will probably be OK.
As someone has already said, get a hammer that feels good in your hand, and has a handle wide enough that the hammer will not turn as you strike the nail. Also get one of the weight for the type of nails you will be driving. If you will be doing a lot of spikes, you want a heavier hammer as it takes less force to set the nail. It will make a big difference after driving them for a day. If you are doing brads, use a small light hammer.
My favorite hammer is about 70 years old or older? (It was my grandfather's) with sufficiently shape to the handle so that it does not wobble in your hand as you are driving the nail.
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On 8/15/2011 7:53 AM, k-nuttle wrote: ...

...
Suspect again... :)
<http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com/Toolmakers-Hammer-With-Magnifying-Glass-Made-in-USA-by-The-LS-Starrett-Company/productinfo/232-53041/
BTW, all Vaughan products are US-made...
<http://hammernet.com/vaughan/pages/products/professional-curved-claw-hammers.php
AFAIK, Estwing still makes their products in US as well...
--
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On 8/15/2011 7:53 AM, k-nuttle wrote:

I really don't see much difference in Harbor Freight and the Dollar Store for the most part.
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wrote:

Yabbut, you're a Festering Prude. Whaddya expect?
P.S: The dollar stores sell what Harbor Freight _won't_.
-- Happiness lies in the joy of achievement and the thrill of creative effort. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt
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You can get Festools at the Dollar Store ??
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On Tue, 16 Aug 2011 09:05:14 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote:

Probably not RSN.
-- Happiness lies in the joy of achievement and the thrill of creative effort. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt
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Leon wrote:

The shattering is/was a primary concern. I could never foresee all of the uses (or misuses) that I find for a hammer. Nobody mentioned this, but hammers help overcome stubborness...wherever you find it.
Thank you all for your comments and suggestions.
Bill
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I think it unlikely that any store would knowingly sell hammers likely to fail in such a way as to cause injury, because of the risk of litigation. However, I have seen hammers with chipped heads, broken shafts and claws, and heads so soft they started to "mushroom"
Quality steel, properly hardened and tempered does matter and personally I would always prefer a wooden shaft.
I have had a 20oz Stanley Claw hammer for over 40 years (I have others too but it's the one I use most) it still does a very good job. I have made one "modification", a blacksmith's trick. Get some of the rubber, self-adhesive binding they use to wrap the handles of tennis raquets and wrap round the shaft as it gives a better more comfortable grip, especially for those of you where weather is hot and hands can become quite sweaty. This is particularly advantageous if you have large hands as it increases the effective diameter. (If you can say something not round has a diameter <g>)
--
Stuart Winsor




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How many "name brand hammers" are now made in China. Sad thing that so many great tool manufactures now use China but the list price cost has not changed. ww
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Shows great progress! No price increases for the last 20 years!
----------- "WW" wrote in message How many "name brand hammers" are now made in China. Sad thing that so many great tool manufactures now use China but the list price cost has not changed. ww
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Get the HFT hammers. If they break before your job is done return them. Get a few of the fiberglass and a few of the wood. Keep the list updated as the "lastability" of the HFT hammers.
As a kid we used rocks to nail bent nails to build club houses. The rocks help up.
Mike in Ohio
PS: I read about the stage collapse on FB. I fee sorrow for the people effected.
On 08/15/2011 03:32 AM, Bill wrote:

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My big pet peeve with the hammers I had was the head would work its way loose. So I bought one that's one piece between the head and shank. So far, it's working out pretty nicely. (I'm not a big hammer user, it's usually used for the occasional nail, a little gentle persuasion here and there and that's it.)
Puckdropper
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