Had a thought


x-no-archive:yes
been looking at jointers and it looks like you canmiter cut on some. (Bevel 45 dgress). Could I use that feature to miter 4 pieces of wood to form posts like I was talking about for a bed?
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You could, it would just take awhile. A long while. Tom
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x-no-archive:yes
WHy would it take awhile?
By the way, I cant find solid white oak posts in my area. tom wrote:

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Maybe because you are only taking off a small amount with each pass?
I'm starting to get the impression your posts are part of some sort of shtick.
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Locutus wrote:

It kind of goes with the no archive flag.
Archives are a valuable part of this group. If take the time to attempt to provide detailed help, it's kind of nice if someone down the road can also use it.
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Barry wrote: Archives are a valuable part of this group.
I sincerely agree. I don't understand the "x-no-archive: yes" mindset. Maybe "stryped" would care to tell us why he doesn't want his queries to have a life? Tom
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I already accused him of trolling.
stryped, we're trying to be helpful, not rude. But you really have to stop this. This group exists to help people and exchange ideas, but you're really asking every little question about every little minute detail, even the obvious stuff. I'm just waiting for the detailed questions about power switches and which way is on or off. I already pointed you to a killer deal on a 6" jointer from amazon. Just buy it and start playing around. You'll figure out most of this stuff the first time you try to make something. A lot of people have given you a lot of good advice. People suggested starting with a smaller project and reading up on the subject. You really should do this before comming here. If you've looked around everywhere and can't find the answer, then post it here. Hell, post if you just want to talk about our favorite subject and have the social interaction. But so far you've been looking for, essentially, a brain dump of everyone here. You're going to have to get experience with this sooner or later, and part of that means taking a risk and buying machinery that may not work out as good as you hope. For machines, everyone here has some winners and some losers. All you can do is post here (or search the archives) asking about specific machines and the reputations of various online or brick and mortar stores. So just go out and do it. Make a small table or step stool or a birdhouse or something and learn from your mistakes, just like the rest of us.
brian
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brianlanning wrote:

I don't know what the OP's intentions are or if he's a troll or not, but I will offer an observation...
I've noticed that some folks suffer from a notion that all their ducks need to be lined up before they start shooting. In other words, when proceeding into uncharted territory, rather than diving in with both feet and learning as they go, they try to proceed cautiously... sometimes TOO cautiously. Rather than deal with obstacles and problems as they come up, they attempt to figure everything out before hand. Granted, sometimes this can be a wise procedure... but understand that it can also be somewhat crippling and that REAL proficiency comes from the trenches... not the sidelines.
I'm guilty of that tendency myself from time to time. Sometimes you have to just push forward and have faith that you'll figure things out as you go. It's also helpful to accept that you may very well make a mess of things your first time out... but know that the second, third and fourth time will go a little better.
So, to the OP, if you are for real, just dive in with both feet the best you can and have faith that you'll figure it out.
Joe Barta
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I concur, and will add, spend as much time making dust asyou do at the keyboard and may of these thruths will simply reveal themselves to you.
Do you wish to be a keybord jockey or a woodworker?
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x-no-archive:yes
I am just trying to get as much info as possible. especially before potentially making a purchase such as a planer/jointer.
I have bought three large woodworkign books and read them almost every night. I also have done a small project. I built a small shadow box for my son's matchbox cars. It turned out ok but when I dado'd the spots for the shelf inserts, they were not perfectly aligned so I need to go back and fix them somehow because the shelves are crooked. brianlanning wrote:

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miter on the table saw and then just clean it up on the jointer. Thats what I would do i think.
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stryped wrote:

Yes, what you're talking about would work, but it's a lot faster to do this on a table saw.
A hollow post will work okay, but if you want it to be more rugged, consider laminating 4 boards 3" wide x 3/4" thick to make a 3" x 3" post. If you glue and clamp them right, the seems will never show. Keep in mind that for a 3" post, the amount of wood you start with is the same in both cases, you just end up trimming a lot off for the hollow/mitered corner version.
Josh
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NO! The joiner will cut nice 45's and that is fine. The joiner cannot however deliver a consistent finished width board. Basically it is equally important when forming a square by mating 8, 45 degree angles that the parallel sides be EXACTLY the same length. A jointer will not and is not intended to do this.
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