H2O dyes versus NGR?

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In my experience if something is considered "water based" it will also be soluble in alcohols (ethanol, isop). And if something is considered "alcohol based" it will also be soluble in water. If it's already a solution in water or alcohol, you can still dilute with either and nothing 'should' separate. *If by some chance the dye you are using has a very low solubility in alcohol or water it might precipitate when you dilute with the non-optimum solvent. I've never seen this happen.
I use TransTint dyes which are sold as a powder and are soluble in either water or ethanol/isopropyl alcohol. In order to decrease grain raising, I would stick with isopropyl over water (evaporates a little slower than ethanol too). I have never tried this but, you could add a little water to your isopropyl in order to slow drying even more. Isopropyl rubbing alcohol is ~30% water already.
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On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 17:12:18 -0700 (PDT), the infamous GarageWoodworks

Brian, aren't you supposed to use anhydrous isopropyl (99% vs 70%) or denatured alcohol, instead of the watery stuff you get for cuts?
Y'know, the same stuff you use for making shellac.
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
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Yes, if you have it. I usually just grab what ever is around the house (I don't use shellac).
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On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 20:03:48 -0700 (PDT), the infamous GarageWoodworks

"Doesn't everyone have gallons of acetone, alcohol, lacquer thinner, and mineral spirits on hand at all times?" he queried in disbelief. We're all DIYers and need solvents for all sorts of stuff every day.

Say no more. <sigh>
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
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On Fri, 02 Apr 2010 20:03:48 -0700, GarageWoodworks wrote:

You have my sympathy :-).
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On Sun, 4 Apr 2010 01:27:24 +0000 (UTC), the infamous Larry Blanchard

2 points!
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
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: So what with all the grain raising and sanding why bother with water : based dyes at all? Seems like a lot of work to get the same color. : I'm a newbie to dyes and am in the middle of using some water based WD : Lockwood dye and am sort of kicking myself for not just getting the : alcohol or oil based stuff. Anyone have any thoughts?
The one time I used NGR (about 12 years ago), it raised the grain.
But the main difference is that water-soluble aniline syes are more lightfast than alcohol-soluble ones.
-- Andy Barss
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On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 18:12:41 -0600, Andrew Barss wrote

Ok, I'm confused here. A number of years ago I settled on water based dye (TransTint) for some white oak ceiling beams. I knew about the fading in sunlight, but since they were always going to be out of the sun.... Anyway, it worked great (still looks the same after 10 years). I avoided the NGR since I had been informed they were difficult to apply and even less light resistant (I sprayed mine). Now I read that the NGR are better in sunlight?
I guess I'll have to revisit the Jewitt site again.
I like the dyes, they make a world of difference when working with blotch prone woods and when trying to get 'clearer' non-pigmented colors. Their big fault is the sunlight fading. This makes them nearly useless to me for anything that sees the sun.
-BR

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