GRR-Ripper System

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Just ordered this from Lee Valley (along with a F1 template for the D4....;-)
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pI712&cat=1,43000
and was wondering what owners think of it after using it for a period of time. Has it worn out (rubber pads), or have parts broken easily? Any "gotcha's" that make it not worthy of the space it takes up? I've been making some small parts recently and after nearly trimming a finger nail, I thought it best to find a better way. This looks good but is it really or is there something better out there that I should look at. Bought the bucket of common sense since mine ran a tad low while making a sewing box....
Is the DVD (optional extra) worth getting?
Thanks,
Bob S.
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<snip>
Don't know how I got along without mine. Wasn't paying proper attention one time and cut a kerf right through the rubber and plastic ( not near my fingers ). No problem, altho I don't recommend the action. It gives really good control on cuts on narrow pieces where I would not have made the cut because of the proximity of the sawblade. This makes those a snap. Definitely MUCH more than a push stick. I am going to order a second one.
Just MHO,
Vic
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I've had one for a while; it's the kind of thing I don't use much, but am very glad I have when I need to make narrow cuts or cuts in small pieces. It works very well. I too have cut through it, and the replacement part was expensive, but I still think the tool is worth having.
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" snipped-for-privacy@aolnojunk.com" wrote in message

I have not one, but two ... "they" can say all they want about 'rolling your own', I now would not want to do without either of them.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 9/17/05
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You can make them and I did for a long time. To have one that will do as much as the Gripper, you either have to make a lot of them in various configurations or put an unreasonable amount of time into building something adjustable. Worth the money. Works well, versatile and cheap if you rather make furniture than tooling.

your
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I found the DVD to have a lot of good information on it, and am glad I ordered one. It has some especially good material on veneering and marketry using the GRR-Ripper.
-- Tom

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You can make your own push blocks that will get the job done. The ones I've seen rely on sacrificial principal.
Now having said that, I own two GRRRippers, a couple of the optional kits, a complete GripTite system with steel fence and a couple of homemade sleds. I use them all and would buy them all again. I think of GRRRippers as useful for for pieces shorter than 18". I use the Griptites for all my longer ripping. I also use the GRRRippers instead of push blocks when I am ripping modest sizes of sheet goods.
Problems? Until I got the hang of how to set them up, I cut up a couple of the pieces by accident. No problem with rubber parts wearing out. You have to clean them every once in while with denatured alcohol. They are very "sticky" when clean. I also use them on my router table.
I did not buy the DVD so cannot comment on how good it is.
Bob
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I think it is. It shows you correct use of the GRR-Ripper and highlights some features and uses you may not know about. You have made a good purchase in my opinion. I love my two GRR-Rippers :) GRR-Ripper Review > http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/reviews/grr-ripper.htm
Regards, Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 6 Reviews: - Veritas Medium Shoulder Plane - Sherwood FM-150 Dust Extractor - Ryobi BT3100K Table Saw System - Senco 41XP Finish Nailer (Review Update) - "Orbiter" Drill Accessory - "Vertiacc" Vertical Drill Press Accessory ------------------------------------------------------------
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Looks like the GRR-Ripper is a winner. I ordered the "system" from Lee Valley but from a couple of the posts, it sounds like there's more to this than what LV has on their site (highly unusual...). I'll do some more research and also order the DVD since it sounds worthwhile.
Thank you all - appreciate the time you spent making your comments.
Bob S.
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Also took the advice of getting a 2nd one. Seemed a waste to pay $6 shipping just for a CD soooo...........
Thanks,
Bob S.
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On 27/09/2005 8:16 PM, BobS wrote:

http://www.microjig.com/GRR-Ripper.htm
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It works very well when cutting small pieces. "tunnel" over the blade feels safe. If you cut into it, not a big deal as th blade likes it as well as wood. Engineered by someone who used it - those little O rings to keep the various fasteners in place are an example I wish others would follow. In fact, I've added O ring keepers to several of my home built jigs!
The DVD (mine was free) is fun to watch. Those guys use a TS like I wouldn't. I'm a fraidy cat!
Long rips, wide boards, nope. The 2 hand technique doesn't work in my brain, so I avoid it. I do not like kickback, so if it's long and narrow, I re-engineer.
Regards.
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Thanks Tom,
As I said, I've been making some small pieces lately and I think I have spent more time making jigs or feather boards to help hold and guide the wood than I have spent making the entire project. Saw this GRR_Ripper on the Lee Valley site and it looked good and as I've read here tonight - others certainly agree. Just placed the order for the 2nd unit a short while ago.
You evidently had a problem with kickback at one time and now won't make a long rip on a wide board now. Try a 7' long 42" wide glued-up table top that needed to have the sides ripped down - that can get your attention. Actually, it was a very safe operation but I practiced pushing the top thru (blade down) several times until I felt comfortable doing it and I knew what the top was going to do at all points along the path - start to finish. With an outfeed table attached to the rear of the saw, a good solid fence and a well tuned tablesaw - it was very easy to do without any one else helping - after I practiced doing it.
Did you ever find out what caused the kickback? If you know the cause - then the cure is to avoid doing it again and following safe practices. Making long rips can be every bit as safe as any other operation on a tablesaw once you know the proper technique and are comfortable with the technique. Practice doing it as I did, with the blade down and do it in slow motion so you can think about your body position, where your hands are and get used to the hand-over-hand feeding technique.
Doing it live with a blade spinning and saw dust flying can be very intimidating so make the dry runs first - power off, blade down. If your equipment isn't up to the task, fix what is needed. I really doubt that you're a fraidy cat as you said - just need someone to show or talk you thru it once or twice until you see the whole process. Practice, practice, practice.....still doesn't make a perfect project... but you'll feel better........;-)
Bob S.
wrote:>

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slow
That's some of the best advise I've read in a long time.
Bob
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And thanks to your post, I'll soon be a bit safer with the GRR-Ripper's keeping my fingers out of way.
Thanks,
Bob S.

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<<<<<< SNIP >>>>>>>>>
Bob:
Appreciate the advice and time you took to post it.
Yep, I had a nasty kick back this past weekend ripping 4" off a 24X48 hunk of 3/4 ply. Luckily I recognized the symptoms as I was running the cut and got the heck out of the way. Only harm was a lovely semi-circular gash through the leading end of the board where the top of the blade caught it. I was almost across the room by then (little guys learn early how to run real fast).
Yes, I know what caused it. Long story cut short. I had dismounted the UHDP side panels on the fence (it's a Jet Xacta) to smooth them up a couple of weeks ago. When I remounted them I put the panel that's normally on the right side (not normally used side) of the fence onto the left, or normal board guiding side. I had not tuned the saw with it on that side. Lo and behold, when I checked it after the excitement the dial indicator showed that the side panel pinched in at the far (out-feed) end by almost .035. The correct panel slants a tiny bit out (~.004) at the out feed - tuned it that way on purpose. Second mistake was that I had failed to snap the splitter back in (after market Bies) before making the cut - don't ask me why. So 2 goofs gave me a gotcha.
Your practice the cut idea is "spot on". Had I done so, I would have immediately noticed the lack of a splitter. I might not have noticed the pinch-in, but with the splitter the odds of a bad kick back would have been less.
So fraidy cat or no, I'll learn, hopefully more from listening to you guys than from my own dumb-ass mistakes.
Regards.
BTW - the "bad" panel went through the planer, was remounted and checked out OK. Also both panels are now permanently engraved with their "Left" "Right" titles in bright red on the top edge.
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Reminds me of the medical practice of clearly indicating on the body where the surgery is to be performed.
Apparently there were some mistakes made before. And they don't want to repeat those mistakes in the future.
Same idea as what you did.
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I think we have a few things in common: short, Jet Xacta, Beis splitter, quick reflexes (duck), learn the hard way.....;-)
Maybe it was one of my posts that you read on how to tune that Xacta fence. Have you added the extra screws? If not - then you obviously have not read my post.
It sounds as though you are *now* well aware of what the hell went wrong and how to correct it next time. You'll remember that one for awhile and hopefully, you'll get in the habit of making a dry run before applying power. Knowing where the stock will be when it exits the blade is as important as knowing where your hands will be at all times.
Bob S.
wrote:

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<<<<<<<<<<< SNIP >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Bob, haven't read it, or don't think I have. Got a title I can google?
Regards.
BTW I'm not exactly short (6'1") but skinny (125#). "Little" just sounds better than skinny. But I can press (not bench press, press) my weight plus about 20%.
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Tom,
Can't find it myself but if I do, I'll make a new post. But here's the gist of it:
This is for the commercial Xacta fence (right-tilt cabinet saw) which has the recessed screws showing on the side-panels (UHMW) and these are abbreviated, not complete procedures:
1. Add more screws (one between each existing screw) so it will pull the side panels flat. 2. You need to elongate "all" the holes on the side panels (on the UHMW) so the side panels will lay flat when screws are tightened. 3. Screw holes on the fence tube (steel tube) need to be filed / ground / hammered down flat -or- use a small forstner bit to recess the back side of the screw holes on the UHMW panel so it does not ride on the high spot where the screw hole is on the steel fence. Be careful, the screw holes are already recessed on the front so don't go deeper than a couple of thousandths. See explanation below. 4. After drilling, recessing the screws and elongating the screw holes, attach the panels and start snugging up the screws - center ones first and work to the ends. 5. After doing that, check with your dial gauge. Low spots between screws can be shimmed if needed using a piece of paper. If you need more than a single folded piece of paper to shim out - you missed a high spot. 6. Align fence as per instructions and be sure it's perpendicular to the table.
Explanation on screw holes. The screw holes on the steel tube are made using self threading screws. These tend to raise the material around the screw hole so the fence side panels cannot lay flat. We're only talking a few thou and it's enough to give you hills and valleys all along the fence. The holes in the UHMW are tight fitting around the screws and need to be elongated so the panel can move laterally as needed. The factory installed screws are not inserted perpendicular to the tube and when screwed down, they push or pull the UHMW side panels making them "bunch-up" (high spot) between the screws. By either making those flat by filing or by making a recess on the back side of the panel and elongating the holes, the panel will now lay flat.
You can also do the other side of the fence but remember - 99.99% of the time, only one side panel of the fence will probably ever be adjusted perpendicular to the table. The sides of the steel tube would have to be parallel for that to happen. Considering that's just a piece of stock tubing they cut to length, weld other parts on then paint - it's not a precision made fence. So align the left side perpendicular and call it a day (assuming you use your fence on the right side of the blade).
You've already flattened your side panels and know how to align the fence so I didn't include any of those steps. If your fence panels are the type which have the key-hole slots on the backside and slide on to standoffs on the steel tube - these instructions will not work. I do recall someone else making a post about how they were able to get theirs flat but had to replace the (insert name of the widget here) items that hold the panels to the fence tube.
Bob S.
wrote:

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