Grizzly / Shop Fox lumber rack

The instructions for the rack recommend against installing the standards over drywall and instead directly to open 2x4s or concrete wall. However the rack is U shaped and the inside dimension is 1.5", so if you put it directly onto a stud it slides right over it, making it impossible to get the tabs of the shelf brackets in.
I was thinking I'd put plywood behind the rack instead of drywall. I only got the 24" long standards and I'll be putting them over the miter saw. I figured I'd ask what others have done as I know some people have used this system.
-Leuf
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I have the same and ripped 1x4's in half to run on top of the stud edges.
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On Tue, 24 Oct 2006 00:41:55 GMT, "Leon"

Works for me. They couldn't have made it a 1/4" narrower..
-Leuf
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In August I installed a pair of their 48" standards to a cinder block wall in my garage using Red Head Concrete Anchors.
My guess for not installing them over drywall would be that, based on the method use to attach the standards to the wall (lag bolts), you might crush the drywall as you drive the bolts in, preventing them from securely butting against a solid surface.
I'd think a plywood backer wouldn't pose the same 'crushing' potential and would work just fine.
They also recommend running the standards to the floor, but, I did not as I reserved the bottom 20-24" for other storage. That said my 3 pair of 12" and 2 pair of 18" well loaded bracket are still hanging. They fill up a lot faster than you'd expect.
Ron
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I installed mine over the drywall. I don't remember them saying not to but it's been a few years since I installed them. I did buy longer lag bolts to accomodate the drywall thickness. That being said, I've got the thing loaded to the hilt and not so much as a single problem. Cheers, cc
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I did the same, no problems so far. The drywall is only slightly indented. On open studs, I'd also consider spacing the standards away from the stud with a stack of washers, or a single large washer (2") between the standard and the stud.
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On Fri, 27 Oct 2006 00:15:48 GMT, Larry Kraus

I kind of suspected there wouldn't really be a problem over drywall. My wall is in the basement under the main beam of the house, and the support columns stick out a good 1/4" from the studs. The opposite side is the stairway and the builders offset the wall in that direction. I do intend to insulate that wall, so it would be prudent to cover it to protect the vapor barrier. I think it will be easier to just fit the drywall or ply between the posts rather than fir out all the studs. Not in any particular hurry to insulate, but gotta do that section before I can put it up.
Since I'm just using the 24" standards, which only have a tab at one end which is meant to slip into the channel of the 48" standard I've got to stick washers under the tab to keep from bending it.
Thanks,
-Leuf
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