Grizzly G0500 8" Jointer on 220/20A circuit


I jut received my G0500. It is pre-wired for 220V and the 2HP motor pulls 12A at that voltage.
Currently (no pun intended) the main tools in my shop are a 2 1/2 HP Bandsaw and a 3HP table saw. I am a one-man shop and have no need for the bandsaw and table saw to be running simultaneously. So, they both run on a single 220V 20A 'dedicated' circuit. Neither tool manual suggested a maximum CB amperage.
The Grizzly manual is very specific about running the Jointer on a (220) 15A circuit because "circuit breakers rated any higher are not adequate to protect the circuit." Earlier in the same paragraph, though, they talk about "...the following guidelines when choosing a circuit breaker." So, guidelines or edicts?
I had planned on using the same 20A circuit for the jointer. If it pulls 12A under normal conditions, placing it on a 15A circuit seems to be hoping for the best. The internal wiring from the starter and switch on the jointer are 14 gauge. It appears to me from other sources that 14 gauge can easily handle 20A. I don't know about the other components, though.
I am reluctant to disreguard a manufacturer's guidance. I suppose I will check with Grizzly support for their answer, but I am curious about how the rec feels about this question.
Thanks for your help, Charlie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Seawulf wrote:
<snip>

Circuit breaker are meant to protect the wires to the outlets. The 20 amp cuicuit will be fine for the jointer.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Seawulf wrote:

What is the gauge of the power cord on the jointer, 14 gauge ?
If something fails you could draw 19 + amps on that power cord. Bet I can find a bottom feeding lawyer that would love someone telling you to plug your jointer into a 20 amp circuit. :)
Guideline: A circuit should not normally draw more than 80% of the rated amperage of the breaker. 15 amps x .8 = 12 amps.
Edict: 14 Gauge Wire max 15 Amps. Your on your own Seawulf. Hope you can swim.
BTW I have a King 15" planer, identical to a Grizzly 15", See thread titled "Twins" a few days ago. 2 HP, probably the same motor as yours. Runs fine on a 15 amp. 240 V circuit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
14 gauge wire is rated for 20 amp service. He'll be fine using the 20 amp circuit.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob wrote:

http://tinyurl.com/9v26p
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I bet you could. Some lawyers are that stupid. He'd loose.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I received the reply from Grizzly Technical Support on this question.
First, let me say that the delay was apparently my fault. They attempted to email me over a week ago, but I did not receive the message. This was apparently due to my SPAM controls. After I entered their email address into my Address Book, I had no problems.
The reply simply said that I could use the Jointer on a 20A circuit. No surprise to most of you who responded.
Thanks for your help, Charlie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I run my G0500 on a 220v 20 amp circuit. I haven't let the smoke out of it so far. If you have a short that would cause the breaker to go, it shouldn't be a problem.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My desk lamp has #18 wire, and it is plugged into a 20a circuit. By Grizzley's reasoning, it should have a 7a breaker instead.
I suppose it is possible that they know something we don't; that defective design or components cause the machine to draw too much current for a period of time, and is resulting in damaged machines. Rather than fix it, they are requiring you to prevent it will small breakers. Unlikely, but possible.
Personally I would use the 20a circuit. BTW, my cottage's 23.5a water heater was hooked up with #12 for 20 years without any problems; if that gives you any confidence. Still, I replaced it with #10.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's very interesting, considering I've got the G0586, which is supposed to be the replacement for the 500, and the spec says it pulls 12A at 220V and that it's a 2HP motor, and recommends a 20A fuse.
http://images.grizzly.com/grizzlycom/specsheets/G0586_ds.pdf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Start-up surge on that motor is going to surpass 15A by quite a lot. With a new breaker, it should be fine at 15A. But if you have an old breaker, or a motor with a higher than usual starting surge, whoops! Grizzly made this sort of a recommendation for a bit, wanting smaller breakers than most other makers recommended, to protect the tool, or so the manuals said. The breaker is not there to protect the tool, but to protect the circuit, and the house/shop/garage from the results of an electrical surge massive enough to melt cable insulation.
I'd go with 20A. The only 230 volt circuits I have in my shop are 30A (well, that's not true: the furnace is 60A). Anyway, never a problem running 12 amp tools on them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I installed the starter switch box on this jointer a few days ago. It includes a "Thermal Overload" device with a dial setting. The dial was set to 15 at the factory.
This would appear to me - non-electrician - to protect the motor from high temp from, for example, an over-current situation, which is the subject of this thread.
If that is the case, the 15A CB on the circuit would be a back-up not the sole protection.
I still have not received a reply from Grizzly tech support on this question.
Charlie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.