Granite & Water Stones

I am in the process of remodeling a bathroom. We decided (good or bad) to use granite tiles for vanity top. We have purchased the tiles and are very happy with the tiles themselves. I have never dealt with granite before and am trying decide how to finish the front edge. I saw the aluminum edging and didn't like it. I want to polish the unfinished sides of the tile and just use tiles to finish the front edge.
The question: Has anyone used waterstones to polish the edge of granite? I tried it on a scrap piece, using 200, 1000 and 4000 grits. It seemed to work pretty well. After only 10 minutes total, the side was pretty smooth to the touch, but was not as glossy as the top (but close). I think a little more time and it will work. I may buy a 6000 or 8000 grit stone to shine it up a bit.
Any thoughts?
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On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 17:31:45 -0500, "Dave B - Parkville, MD"

Howdy,
I suspect that it would be easier (and certainly much less costly) to use abrasive paper instead of the stones.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 21:24:31 -0600, Kenneth wrote

I used silcon carbide papers for the exposed edges around a kitchen sink. It took some time, but I was able to round over about 8 linear feet of 1/4" tile edge in an hour (180 grit through 600)
For the counter edges I just wrapped in hickory to match the cabinets.
-Bruce
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wrote:

Hi Bruce,
The hickory edging sounds beautiful...
'Just curious:
How did you mount it?
Thanks,
--
Kenneth

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Dave B - Parkville, MD wrote:

Most shops use silicon carbide papers (the waterproof black stuff used by body shops) and equipment that feeds water through the center of the pad, to flush away the ground up stone. Several stages of grit, just like working on wood, but a lot slower and messier. Go out to a fine grit of your preference, then use a buffer and rubbing compound to get that polished finish. If you do use granite, make sure you relieve the edge before you go through the sanding/polishing steps. A sharp stone corner on the edge of the counter is a real hazard in a bathroom. At minimum, I'd at least use a 1/4 inch or so wide 45 degree, or a 1/4 round over. You can typically use carbide tools on granite, but you have to go slow and may need to provide cooling. (Can't recall seeing a water protected router for years, though).
One way to finish the edge I've used that wife really liked (in a kitchen) was a 3/4 x 1 1/2" wooden molding on the edge. You can match the wood with the rest of the room or house and it can tie things together from an architectural design standpoint. It also makes for a LOT softer edge for an elbow, and is easy to put in place before you grout the tile. If you do use wood, use the best exterior quality finish you can, as most interior finishes just don't like the high-frequency of water a countertop edge will see.
Waterstones will work, but it will take you a very long time to do it all with only "elbow grease" as the power source...
--Rick
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[snip]

There are many waterproof routers, but most are over $ 3000.00. Carbide and granite? Even water cooled it just won't fly. You can, sometimes, get away with small touch-up on marble, but granite is just too hard for carbide. You can get discs for your angle grinder with diamonds, which you can use dry, and they're not that expensive. But the dust is insane. http://www.granquartz.com /
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On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 17:31:45 -0500, "Dave B - Parkville, MD"

I used the diamond impregnated pads from here, successfully on my granite tile edges in the kitchen.
http://granitecitytool.com/showcat.cfm?catnum &pcatnum&keyword1=Diamond%20Polishing%20Pads
They also sell router bits, but those are more for shaping an edge rather than merely polishing them up.
I was able to make a small chamfer on the underside of the tiles with these pads.
Renata
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i use one of these for polishing glass, concrete, or granite:
http://www.defusco.com/Power-&-Pneumatic-Tools-Wet-Stone-Grinders-&-Polishers/c78_31/p2629/ALPHA-422-WET-STONE-POLISHER---COMPLETE-KIT/product_info.html
if you have a lot to do, it would make things go a lot faster. you could probably sell on ebay for about what you paid after using it on one job.
regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/ChaniArts
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