Granite countertops. Radioactive?

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I just got one of these saws with the granite top. Given that the top is quarried in China and China's recent reputation for product safety, I am somewhat concerned my boys are gonna fry....
Could take care of that middle-aged prostate without having to get probed though ;-)
D'ohBoy
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You're planning on a prostatectomy with your saw??!!!
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Best regards
Han
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On Thu, 24 Jul 2008 10:23:12 -0700, Robatoy wrote:

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The main railway station in Edinburgh (that's in Scotland), Waverley Station, is built into solid granite. I was told once that if a nuclear plant had the same ambient radioactivity (or whatever they call it) the plant would be evacuated and shut down for a very loooong time :-)
Granite is, apparently, a naturally radioactive mineral.
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Not all granite is hot. Scottish granite is known to be. One of the most radioactive buildings in all of Britain is the Marischal College at University of Aberdeen ( second or third largest granite building on the planet). As I recall G.P. Thompson (JJ Thompson's son) did some of the early quantum mechanical experiements on electrons there.
And back to the original topic: which is more carcinogenic -- the radon coming out of granite or the nasty chemical binders in solid surface or quartz chip like silestone?
hex -30-
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Which nasty chemical binders?
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Yes.
All granite is radioactive.
The activity varies, a lot. Most granites are somewhat hotter than most sedimentary stone, but the sedimentary stone at the Okla mine is probably hotter than any granite.

It depends of course.
It's the dose that makes a poison.
--
FF



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I believe the main radioactive component in granite is a uranium-containing mineral. Uranium is radioactive, but emits only alpha particles, ie helium nuclei. Their energy is very low, and will not even penetrate the topmost layer of skin, which is already dead tissue. It is likely that table salt is more dangerous.
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Robatoy wrote:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/24/garden/24granite.html?no_interstitial=&pagewanted=all I think that if you check many of stones and concretes are to some degree radio active, and as said before would fail the criteria for a nuclear power plant.
This is one reason why we should reevaluate government regulation to make it easier to build nuclear power plants. Nuclear energy is the one and only clean energy. A nuclear plant can be built on a finite amount of land. The energy output can be double or tripled in the same space. (Based on the original design of the Shearon Harris plant.)
Forgetting the obvious benefits of a clean cheap energy source of energy, the facilities can provide large of lakes and recreational facilities. (Again the Shearon Harris plant as an example)
Based on the windmill farm in southern California, it takes about 8 acres ground for one windmill--> more energy, more windmills, and more acres are cleared and many access roads built to service the windmill farm. These acres can be used only for windmills because of the revolving blades.
Corn is similar, I believe it takes about 25 acre per year to make one tank truck of alcohol (4000 gallons). Believe it or not there is a limited amount of farmable land available in the world. Do the math.
Acres farmland available = Acres for energy corn production + acres for food production (animal and human) One goes up the other goes down.
Alcohol is not an viable fuel source. People don't do much in the acres used to grow corn.
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Isn't one of the problems with that design the "lake"or cooling pond? If I remember right the water in the pond is "hot" when compared to other bodies of water in the area. This could lead to such enviormental disasters as: ducks not wanting to fly south in the winter, open water fishing in winter, larger fish then in other bodies of water. When there was a proposed plant being built near Louisville Ky the tree huggers were saying that the river temp would be 5 to 10 degrees higher then normal in the Ohio river. They were right the water at the plant was supposed to be up to 5 degrees higher then normal but by the time it hit Louisville 30 miles down stream it would be 2 degrees or less higher then normal, according to the engineers. The plant was never finished, converted to a coal fired plant and then never finished or used.

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"Did you know, that swallowing small amounts of saliva, over a long period of time, causes cancer?" George Carlin
That's about where I classify this sort of thing. If they tested every square inch of our little worlds we would find that there is no place safe. Those that are turned to jelly from something like this will find some other benign element else to kill them eventually - wind or rain or sun - oh yea - they already blamed those.
K.
Interesting:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/24/garden/24granite.html?no_interstitial=&pagewanted=all
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Looking at bacon under a microscope, running with scissors, yup, all fall in that category. I think that the interesting part was that there is a lot of difference between origin and grades of granite. Some of it, quite 'hot' compared to those levels allowed at nuclear plants. (My oldest daughter is an operator at a 3500MW generating station and she has shared some of knowledge her about 'safe' levels of different radiations.)
But.... if you have a choice between NO emissions or 'some' emissions from a countertop, it is my duty to inform the client. The same way as I do when I strongly suggest the use of an acrylic based product over a polyester based countertop.
At the same time, I don't think that the owners of granite are going to give birth to three-headed lizards.
r
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Looking at bacon under a microscope, running with scissors, yup, all fall in that category. I think that the interesting part was that there is a lot of difference between origin and grades of granite. Some of it, quite 'hot' compared to those levels allowed at nuclear plants. (My oldest daughter is an operator at a 3500MW generating station and she has shared some of knowledge her about 'safe' levels of different radiations.)
But.... if you have a choice between NO emissions or 'some' emissions from a countertop, it is my duty to inform the client. The same way as I do when I strongly suggest the use of an acrylic based product over a polyester based countertop.
At the same time, I don't think that the owners of granite are going to give birth to three-headed lizards.
r
It was very interesting to say the least. Good information and I learned something this morning. It was particularly interesting since I have the granite out in my garage all set to go into the kitchen in the next couple of weeks. Luckily, I am way too old to be birthin' any more little lizards ;D
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Well, if you do, I'm guessing the first thing done about it will be the disposing of the granite countertop.
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wrote in message

Well, if you do, I'm guessing the first thing done about it will be the disposing of the granite countertop.
LMAO... well... maybe lizard soup instead ;D
K.
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wrote

Well, I got a copy of a newspaper, the Onion, dated July 24, which announced "Queen Elizabeth II announces she's pregnant again"
Oh well, it's the Onion ...
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Han
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Kate wrote:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/24/garden/24granite.html?no_interstitial=&pagewanted=all

While we are on the subject of dangerious substances consider:
DIHYDROGEN MONOOXIDE: The vapor can cause sever burns, the condensate if breathed can cause death by drowning and the solid form can freeze body tissue leading to loss of that tissue.
BTW: DIHYDROGEN MONOOXIDE IS: H2O
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David G. Nagel wrote:

Also one of the components is a highly toxic gas that causes convulsions at 1.6 bar pressure, leading to death if not promptly treated.

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Ya'll are just too damn smart to be working on wood!
K.

Also one of the components is a highly toxic gas that causes convulsions at 1.6 bar pressure, leading to death if not promptly treated.

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Also severe lung injury if breathed for longer than about 20 mins continuously at lower pressures

-- >replace spamblock with my family name to e-mail me >Pics at http://www.meekings.net/diving/index.shtml and http://www.meekings.net/photo-groups/nui/index.shtml
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On Jul 26, 2:42 am, snipped-for-privacy@spamblock.net (Jerome Meekings) wrote:

Exposure to the pure gas at a pressure of one bar it will cause third degree burns within seconds. You definitely won;t last 20 minutes.

And "HHO" gas is actually a misspelling of 2H2 + O2, also called Brown's gas.
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