Good planer sled designs?

Page 2 of 2  
On 2/21/2012 6:19 AM, CW wrote:

Your persistent avoidance of the particulars is making you look like a wise-ass. I never said I couldn't do it (as I explained, by using hand planes to get a reasonably flat reference surface on one side to lay face-down on the planar table), I just said that it was a hell of a lot of work and I didn't WANT to do it. You (with some help from "dpb") are continually implying that you can do it WITHOUT any initial rough flattening of one side (though I suspect you're using your hand-held power planer that you've implied you own), and by refusing to explain yourself further you are only being contentious and are not contributing anything to the conversation.
--
Free bad advice available here.
To reply, eat the taco.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/21/2012 9:16 AM, Steve Turner wrote: CW wrote:

We've been here before. He goes on an on about being able to do it, but never says how. Almost no one else can do it, and I can't do it either, and I tried. It's not easy even with a sled. Twist is a bitch and is mostly fire wood unless you want to make a big effort to get a little wood out of the mess.
I never said I couldn't do it (as I explained, by using hand

That's how about everyone but CW see's it, and he's too freaking nasty to tell anyone his secret, so I figure he's full of it.
--
Jack
Add Life to your Days not Days to your Life.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I saw a jig in an older issue of WOOD magazine that might help. What it was basically was a frame for the router to sit on and move forwards and backwards and left and right. The router would then be used for truing the board.
Construction was basically two parallel boards, that a cross piece could move forwards and backwards on, and that cross piece had a slot that the router and bushing/bearing moved in.
I imagine using this jig would take more time than using the planer, but it might be useful on a twisted or particular troublesome board.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Steve Turner" wrote in message
I have about 180bf of Shagbark Hickory (ten 8/4 boards, 9 feet long by 12" wide) that I need to get surfaced, but I seem to have misplaced my 12" jointer, and this little 6" jobbie just ain't gonna be of much help. Normally when I'm faced with the initial face-jointing of boards wider than my jointer I break out the jack planes and the No. 8 Bailey and go to town, and usually have a good time doing it. But with a giant stack of harder-than-nails Hickory? I don't think so. I'd look like Popeye by the time I got done. I know that some of you fart smellers forgo the jointer altogether and use the planer instead, and since I have a nice big 15" Grizzly that eats Hickory for lunch I figure it's time for me to build a sled. Any favorite designs? I know I could just screw two straight and true tubafours to either side of the boards and run that through, but I rather not run screws into the wood if I can help it. Side rails on a plywood base with pointy setscrews locking the boards in place? What about adjustability? I'd rather not build a fancy sled if it can't be used on boards of varying widths. Any and all opinions welcome. ===================================================================I'd just use the planer myself but everybody tells me that that is impossible so I will suggest you get a hand plane with a tail on it.
--
Any given amount of traffic flow, no matter how
sparse, will expand to fill all available lanes.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.